How Boudoir Photography Can Make Your Clients Feel Beautiful

8/01/2018

Boudoir photography is intimate and personal, and as a result, it physically and mentally strips down models. It’s different than other types of photography in that it can bring out people’s vulnerability, insecurity, and hesitance. As a professional, you want to get the best photos, and in order to do so during these exposed shoots, it’s important to take a minute or two to check in with how the client is feeling. Clients will step in front of the camera with tight muscles and bundled nerves, and it’s your job to ease them. Every day people hold up a magnifying glass to scrutinize their tiniest flaws, and boudoir photography is the chance to show them the beauty everyone else sees in them.

Since boudoir photography can be so intimate, photographer Susan Eckert emphasizes tapping into the psychology of humans in order to build a loyal client base. Susan recalls a session where a client got too in her head, began to feel insecure, and hyperventilated. The client, Anne, had recently lost a significant amount of weight, and the boudoir setting was causing her to feel awkward and overweight in her skin. Susan was able to calm her down by showing her the photos they had snapped so far, making Anne to realize how far she had come in her weight loss journey. The girl she imagined in her head was not the girl being photographed. This moment brought Anne out of her shell, allowed her to be proud of her progress, and truly enjoy the shoot.

Boudoir photography isn’t about you and your style; it’s about your client, making them comfortable in their own body, and photographing them in their personal space. Taking some time to relax them by getting to know them can significantly improve a photo session. It will allow you to personalize a shoot according to your client’s needs whether that includes a soft, delicate lighting scheme or a dark, edgy background.

Part of drawing out a client’s confident side is making them comfortable truly expressing themselves in front of the camera. A great way to do this is to ask them why they wanted to get photos taken in the first place. What do they wish to get out of them? Ask them about their life experiences, and find a way to incorporate their stories into the shoot to allow the client to feel at home. From there, you can approach the shoot calmly and correctly.

Between every shot, be alert to how your client is feeling. If they look uncomfortable, they probably are. Take a moment to get them out of that space and put them in a more positive state of mind. Don’t just keep snapping photos because you’ll be disappointed in what appears on your camera screen, and no client wants to buy awkward-looking photos. During these check-ins, show the client what photos you’ve taken so far, double-check that they align with what the client envisioned, and ask if they want to make any adjustments. You may not want the client to interfere with your creative vision, but if you make sure the client is happy and comfortable, it ensures the client will love the photos, purchase them, and return for your services over and over again.

To read the full article visit Professional Photographers Magazine. In this article, you’ll learn not only how to make your clients more comfortable, but how to price your boudoir photography appropriately so you get paid for your precious time. If you’re not already member, don’t forget to join PPA to get the latest advice and news in the photography world!