a late entry...
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Thread: a late entry...

  1. #1
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    Default a late entry...

    thoughts? feedback? title?
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  2. #2
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    What made you choose to do the step mount bottom justified rather than top justified? Not sure whether I'd like it better the other way; sometimes it's better to just try it and see.

    title: Staking His Claim
    Mark Levesque, CPP, M. Photog., Cr. Photog, A.C. Ph., CPP Liaison, PPCC Judge

  3. #3
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    Default I did that first....

    but wasn't happy with it... what do you think?
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    I'd first put a stroke around it...that way it doesn't "fade to black". My concern, however, is whether there is any detail in the sillouette(sp)....if not, the print will suffer. The difference between detail in the dark areas and none is probably 6-10 points.
    ____________________
    Dave Cisco M.Photog, Cr., CPP, F-TPPA

  5. Default

    Nice photo.

    I like the image best when it is step mounted at the bottom. This puts the bird closer to the rule of thirds "power points" in the lower right.

    I agree with Dave about the stroke. It does just fade into nothing at the bottom. I gave it a slightly tighter crop and a stroke. I'm not sure about the color I choose but with a nice stroke it would be better.

    I also cloned out the hole on the fence post - I think the sun shining through under the bird is distracting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Cisco View Post
    My concern, however, is whether there is any detail in the sillouette(sp)....if not, the print will suffer. The difference between detail in the dark areas and none is probably 6-10 points.
    Is this always true? I thought that for a true silhouette - which I'm assuming Sue Ellen is going for here - it was important that there be very little detail in the black areas. Am I wrong about this?
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    Last edited by Stacey_West; 06-13-2007 at 09:11 AM.
    Stacey West, CPP
    Loft Photography
    Ardmore, OK

  6. #6
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    Default I am sure he meant ...

    Hi Stacey;

    I am sure that Dave meant detail in the bird when he said there should be detail in the silhouette. Any of us who have ever been a print judge are used to walking right up to the print to check sharpness. So you can't count on them not noticing a lack of sharpness from the normal six feet.

    If any part is less than sharp it might help to blur everything but the bird evenly which will make it appear that much sharper.

  7. #7
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    IMO, this print will not merit. It's a pretty image to decorate your home or studio, but it just doesn't have anything that makes me want to keep looking at it. The greatest images - again IMO - are those that make me think about something, where I can read a story or feel an emotion from looking at the image. Or maybe the image draws me in because the design or color harmony is intriguing or the lines and patterns keep me looking. Here I see a bird on a post and nothing makes me want to look at this again. I think that lack of story to get me involved would be the greatest challenge to this image meriting.

    On the technical side, maybe it's the low res file and small size but the bird and post doesn't appear tack sharp on my moniter. I don't agree that there needs to be detail in the bird in order to merit. Some silhottes are a totally black shape and will merit, some have detail visable and will merit. It just depends on each print. The other major challenge is that the setting sun, or brightest part of the image, is behind the center of interest, rather than centered behind the bird, drawing the eye down and back.

    If you want to go ahead with this image here are my suggestions. Make it a long narrow slim line - like 4"x20". Extend the background on the left if you have to, to get that long slim line. Sharpen the image so the outline of the bird and post is crisp. Be wary of over sharpening. In PS create a rim light along the top edge of the bird, everywhere it would naturally appear in a back light situation. Mount it so the bird falls at the lower left intersection of thirds. Choose your black mat around the image from the darkest area of the print. Stroke it with a very fine line from the mid orange of the sunset. Title needs to be something to create a story line in the judge's mind because this print doesn't create impact from design and composition, so story needs to carry it. I would call it "Stood Up Again". I am still doubtful that it would merit but I think it will get in the mid to upper 70's with those changes. If the panel has several guys who have been stood up at some time in their life, it might just slip over.
    Keith
    Keith A. Howe
    M.Photog.,M.Artist, Cr.,D.F.Ph.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacey West View Post
    Is this always true? I thought that for a true silhouette - which I'm assuming Sue Ellen is going for here - it was important that there be very little detail in the black areas. Am I wrong about this?
    It has been my experience that judges consider the image area to be a pallet for "presenting" your work. Total loss of detail is total loss of information. I don't mean the following to be harsh on ANYONE, but total loss of detail is EASY to do. Retaining detail, even in the darkest areas, is very difficult, but highly rewarded.
    ____________________
    Dave Cisco M.Photog, Cr., CPP, F-TPPA

  9. #9
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    Thanks to all for comments.

    IMO, this print will not merit.
    As a beginner, I approached competition wrong from the beginning...in that I never ever expected to merit the first time, so I just entered my best or favorite images to get experience and feedback. So, when one of my images did merit (deservedly so...I can tell why it did and others did not) I found my personal expectations rise sharply: If I can do it once, I have no excuse for not doing it again. and again. and again. But while my expectations have changed, my level of experience has not...and while I create some strong images, I understand that they are not yet merit worthy.

    So...I missed the original deadline because I continued to try to create merit images....I didn't want to send only one print in the case, and I didn't want to send less than merit images. I think my adjusted expectations are getting in the way of just entering and learning.

    Sharpen the image so the outline of the bird and post is crisp. Be wary of over sharpening.
    I have never sharpened an image. I see how to do it. I have experimented with it. I am apparently not in tune with what constitutes good sharpening. Can you offer any more description, either in the forum or by phone?

    In PS create a rim light along the top edge of the bird, everywhere it would naturally appear in a back light situation.
    it looks to me like the bird is rimmed in light all the way around the body...so I am not sure what you are telling me here.???

    Mount it so the bird falls at the lower left intersection of thirds.
    Lower left?

  10. #10

    Default

    Sue Ellen,

    I'm not going to comment on the technical stuff but I WILL tell you to pay the extra to have the video critique. INVALUABLE!
    Linda Gregory
    www.lindagregory.com

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