High Contrast Portrait
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  1. #1

    Default High Contrast Portrait

    What do you think of this image for state competition?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Platte, NE
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    4,986

    Default

    Cat
    This is a nice image, Where are you from? Have you entered before? Is your state an affialiated judging? I ask because I can't see any details of where you are located in your profile and this would have answered most of these questions. I believe this image to be in the above average catagory - say a 78 or so. To me it is a little hard to tell from the low res file here but I feel it is a bit flat as far as lighting is concerned. This image could go as a vert or horz. I feel that if you want it to be a horz. I would have cropped in a bit more off the bottom. If you were to go vert. I would lose the left side. I do not feel that there is a huge difference either way.
    Why the blur into her hair on the left and lower portions and just a wee bit on the right side of the image? To me I would leave the blur off if possible at least from the hair and burn the shaddows of camera left side of the hair, it fades away a bit too much. I feel that the image size could come down a bit as in a 16x20 the head size is larger than life. Then position it on the presentation in the upper R corner with a fine stroke around the orginal file to frame it and give it a finished presentation. I am not good at titles but a good title would help this image.
    Keith
    Keith A. Howe
    M.Photog.,M.Artist, Cr.,D.F.Ph.

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi Keith,
    I am from MA and I entered comp for the first time last year. I scored in the high 70's on 5 prints. I agree the lighting is a bit flat but I thought it worked for the high key ness of the image, and htat maybe it worked as it is different. Maybe I am wrong. I will try your suggestions and post back. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
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    9,214

    Default One thought ...

    Hi Cat;

    A lot of photographers think they have a good ratio, when doing hi-key, only to discover that all that light bouncing around fills in the shadows they made.

    One suggestion for you ... instead of using a softbox, umbrella, or even a parabolic as the key light ... try using a grid-spot. This will help you create a good ratio and keep it. Light from it only strikes where you point it. Using a parabolic, with barn doors, is another good way to go. Both will give you excellent spectral highlights ... which you don't get from other light modifiers.

  5. #5

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    That image was all natural light. I have 5 windows and my walls are ivory. She is positioned in a corner with white walls on either side and blow her. Thus the filling in of shadows.How could I create the same effect, darken one of the walls (or prop a black board)?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
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    Default Subtractive lighting ...

    Hi Cat;

    Ok, with your set-up, if you use a black reflector you can deepen the shadows. It's the same as you would use for subtractive lighting outdoors. Leon Kennamer used to do a terrific program on using black reflectors as did Dean Collins.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Platte, NE
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by D. Craig Flory View Post
    Hi Cat;

    Ok, with your set-up, if you use a black reflector you can deepen the shadows. It's the same as you would use for subtractive lighting outdoors. Leon Kennamer used to do a terrific program on using black reflectors as did Dean Collins.
    ditto
    Keith
    Keith A. Howe
    M.Photog.,M.Artist, Cr.,D.F.Ph.

  8. #8

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    I do have more images from the session that have better lighting where I used a black backdrop and not the white corner. I was not drawn to them as much as the one I posted though. Should I just forget this one for com because of the flatness?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,214

    Default Enter or not ...

    Hi Cat;

    Entering competition is how you learn. I would see what the judges say during the competition and also during the print critques.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Platte, NE
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cat broderick View Post
    I do have more images from the session that have better lighting where I used a black backdrop and not the white corner. I was not drawn to them as much as the one I posted though. Should I just forget this one for com because of the flatness?
    It is hard to say with out seeing the other images. Another thing that plays into the answer is What are your goals in entering?
    Keith
    Keith A. Howe
    M.Photog.,M.Artist, Cr.,D.F.Ph.

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