DVD submission
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: DVD submission

  1. Default DVD submission

    Does anyone have a recommendation for the size/resolution/file format one should use when saving images to be rendered to a DVD movie for the image certification?

    Should you save the images like you would before sending them to a lab for prints, or since it will be viewed on a monitor, should you save them at more like 100dpi, etc?

    Also, does each image have to be an 8x10 (or 4:5 aspect ratio) or can you have 8x8, 8x12, etc in the portfolio of images?

    Thanks in advance for any help/guidance.

  2. #2

    Default

    http://ourppa.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1299

    Definitely save them at 300dpi minimum.

    4:5 is the for the television and even if your image is 8x10 if their watching it on a 50" plasma then it will be more like an 11x14 or 16x20 so your more deciding the crop not the actual size the image will be displayed.

    With DVD submission it must be viewable on a DVD player so burn the show to a DVD-R disc and ensure it displays for the minimum amount of time (3 seconds I belive).

    Check out the other thread too!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,214

    Default Answers for John and Zack

    Good morning John and Zack;

    I'll get back on later with a definite answer on resolution for the DVD. For now ... you both spoke of dpi. That is for printed forms like price lists and such. With digital images we talk about ppi. Dpi is dots per inch. Ppi is pixels per inch. If you send an image to the lab you are using ppi. If you have an image printed in a magazine you are talking about dpi.

    D. Craig Flory PPA Certrified, PPA C.P.P. Liaison, Cr.Photog., ASP
    floryphotog@mindspring.com

  4. #4

    Default

    I don't know the answer for this, but will wait to hear what Craig finds out.

    But I can tell you that anytime I have to create a show or as we do every month for a salon I help with in NY, the biggest you ever need for a projector and the majority of monitors is 1024 pixels by 768 pixels at 72ppi. No more than that. Anything else will have to be sized down to that and that results in 2 things happening. One, it slows down your program showing the images because the files are bigger than they need to be and two, it might soften your files when it's res'd down.

    The max on any projector is the 1024x768 @ 72ppi. That's it. Yes, it is a small file, but any more is just excess.

    If you're making prints, then it's a different ballgame.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,214

    Default Not much more ...

    Hi group;

    PPA reps were in meetings today. I got to talk to a rep, a few minutes ago, and they said that Jack's suggestion sounded good. I got no definitive answer when I asked for a list of suggested programs to use. He agreed with me ... when any of you have all 20 images ready to burn ... call PPA to see if more information is ready. I read the .pdf and it seems to be incomplete and doesn't answer as much as I'd like to see addressed. So as I said ... when ready to burn a movie / DVD ... call (800) 786-6277 and ask PPA certification department at that time.

    D. Craig Flory PPA Certified, Cr.Photog., PPA C.P.P. Liaison, ASP
    floryphotog@mindspring.com

  6. #6

    Default When I did the certification...

    ...it wasn't a DVD of stills, it was DVD-Video. Resolution meant nothing as NTSC video is 720x480 pixels (well, DV video is...) so resolution on the image is pretty much moot. And regardless of the resolution of your projector, if it projects NTSC video you get the same 720x480 pixels for that input.
    -Assoc. degree, commercial photography
    -Certified Professional Photographer
    BLOG

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,208

    Default

    Good point Wilson. Craig, can we find out a little more about the playback format on the DVD? I can think of several different ways a DVD of images could be created, but it's probably easier if we were able to define the submission requirements in a bit more detail.
    Betsy Finn, Cr.Photog., CPP
    bphotoart :: learnwithbetsy :: email

  8. #8

    Default

    According to this televisons display images at a specified resolution but do not specify a PPI (like a CCD on digital cameras). http://www.ideastraining.com/PDFs/Un...Resolution.pdf

    So a typical resolution TV will display at 704x480 (9.77"x6") or 800x600 (11.11"x8.33) for projectors but if it's a high def output device 1920x1080 (26.6"x15") there will be much more detail. BUT, while DVD has great detail it isn't high def... it's scaled down to 720x480. The reason it doesn't designate a PPI is because there's a wide variation on the amount of display pixel in every display. Some sets just have more pixels some just have less that are spaced further apart. Theres also the 1024x720 resolution but thats just the mid point between HD and standard def.

  9. #9

    Default I don't think so, Zack...

    From my understanding, if you select a video input on a projector, you get 720x480 pixels regardless of the maximum resolution of the projector. So if you wish to project only NTSC video, getting a projector of greater resolution than 800x600 is a waste. The device would have to have a line doubler/quadrupler in order to create the additional data/pixels to project NTSC video at higher resolutions. The early projection televisions (notably Pioneers) had line doublers so they could claim 800 lines of resolution even though the video source BY LAW cannot exceed 525 lines of resolution. I don't have a projector so it's certainly possible they contain line doublers now but as far as I know just because you crank up the resolution on a projector doesn't turn a 1024x768 image into 1600x1200 or something like that.

    If I'm correct, creating a DVD video of your certification images has little concern for the actual number of pixels in the individual image. In fact, since you'll be downsampling the image to a 720x480 format, you'll need good software to prevent unwanted artifacts.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zack Davis
    According to this televisons display images at a specified resolution but do not specify a PPI (like a CCD on digital cameras). http://www.ideastraining.com/PDFs/Un...Resolution.pdf

    So a typical resolution TV will display at 704x480 (9.77"x6") or 800x600 (11.11"x8.33) for projectors but if it's a high def output device 1920x1080 (26.6"x15") there will be much more detail. BUT, while DVD has great detail it isn't high def... it's scaled down to 720x480. The reason it doesn't designate a PPI is because there's a wide variation on the amount of display pixel in every display. Some sets just have more pixels some just have less that are spaced further apart. Theres also the 1024x720 resolution but thats just the mid point between HD and standard def.
    -Assoc. degree, commercial photography
    -Certified Professional Photographer
    BLOG

  10. #10

    Default

    if you select a video input on a projector, you get 720x480 pixels regardless of the maximum resolution of the projector.
    I've heard this to. The only way to get a truly HD picture from a project (as far as I have heard/researched) is to use a DVI connection so that the image is completly digital instead of being change from digital to analog and back to digital so it can be projected...

    But a good piece of software should be just what you need. We use Pro Show Producer and just love it. We've used Nero when we first started doing slideshows and it's simple, does a good job at the render but takes a lot longer then Pro Show.

    Maybe someday (in the not to distant future) they will make it so the images can be uploaded for review?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Live Chat is open