8X10 Competition - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Palmyra, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9,214

    Default My thoughts

    Hi John; I disagree on three things. Number one ... I send all my work, over the net, using ftp ... to my lab. It costs me $15.99 for a 16"X20" plus the cost of mounting. I spray the prints in my spray booth. So it now costs me less, for a print case of four, than it did before for one print. Every image I send has been fully enhanced, & prepared, in Photoshop by me.

    Secondly, it is our job to teach clients to understand print quality and saturation. The most knowledgable clients have track lighting or photo lights over their images.

    Third ... even though we do have a competition of 8"X10"s and three judges, our main convention competition is 16"X20"s with five judges and an alternate. One of the best learning experiences is sitting in on a print competition to see what images score best. An 8"X10" at the back of the room does nothing to help because you can't see what it is that they just commented on but a 16"x20" is big enough. Then later they can walk around the print racks and see close up what they viewed.

    One other thought ... if you belong to your state group (I strongly recommend that) try having a print critique at a meeting to go over possible images for competition. You could go with more than enough for a print case and narrow it down to the best four. If you don't belong to your state group, consider dropping WPPI and joining. And if you have friends who are Masters ... ask one or more to be a mentor you can send images to for opinions as to which should do well.

    So even though I enjoy our 8"X10" competition, I always look forward to the real test at our convention. My suggestion for you is to get on print committee at PPA or at your state association. You will learn a lot about what goes on.

    Sincerely; D. Craig Flory PPA Certified

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Since I stopped entering PPofA print competitions long ago because of my dislike of the intense lighting used, I guess you and I will just have to agree to disagree about "saturation" and special lighting in the homes of our clients.

    The concept that the competition 16X20s cost too much was introduced to me by an employee of one of the most highly regarded labs in the country. I'm glad you have found a method that holds your costs down. Most people are not so lucky!

    Is there A PPofA 8X10 print competition that is a preliminary for 16X20 judging? I believe the display conditions at many competitions for accepted prints do not provide bright enough lighting for the 16X20s. 8X10s could be displayed more easily. Also having gone to many judgings I've observed that the fact that 16X20s were used doesn't increase the visability for most attending who are not judges. If 8X10s were used a digital projection from a scanner could be employed so that the print could be seen better by all.

    I was just making some suggestions that I thought might benefit photographers that compete in print judgings.
    Photography by Earl
    www.photographybyearl.net

    Tuscaloosa, Alabama

  3. #13

    Default

    If you read the rules carefully, you found that you can enter ANY SIZE image as long as it is mounted on a 16" x 20" board. I could have mounted a postage stamp in the bottom corner of the mount board if it would have added to the presentation of the image. I actually had all four of my competition images printed by Costco as 12" x 18" images and then mounted them on black foam core from the local office supply. Total cost for each entry was around $10 and 3 out of my four entries hung. I know other photographers that have hung images that were ink jet prints. It is not the size of the image that we should be talking about but rather what we can do with that image to create the emotional and visual impact that will move the judges to score 80 or higher.

    There are many avenues within the PPA structure which allow you to secure opinions as to which of your images might score higher in competition. Local affiliates and guilds generally hold monthly print competition and PPA State Affiliates generally hold one or two annual competitions at which you can be scored by a jury of you peers. One word of caution, these competitions are not usually judged by PPA affiliated jurors, so scores do not always reflect the PPA International scoring level.

    For the last two years PPA has held a "digital entry" image competition. Although no merits were issued for entries in this competition, it was judged by PPA Affiliated Jurors so it was a good proving ground for my competition images that I was considering sending to the International Print Competition. I was able to submit one image per CD so my hard cost was about $1 for all four entries plus the incredibly low $35 entry fee. The judges viewed the images on a 32 inch plasma monitor and they could have projected those images with a data projector if the audience had been larger.

    PEC has also had a free service the last couple of years available in the print exhibition area at the Imaging USA convention. I was able to bring 10 - 8x10s to the convention and sit down with a PPA Affiliated Juror for about half an hour and pick their brain as to which images had more impact and what I could do to improve them. If I felt I needed a second opinion, I was able to schedule another appointment the next day and talk with a different judge. Again, this service was FREE and the convention programs and the trade show was a wonderful bonus.

    Print competition has really forced me to expand my way of thinking when creating images and has taught me to view subject matter from a more artistic point of view. In comparing my work today with images I created as little as five years ago, I can personally see the growth in my creativity.

    Keep striving for perfection.

    Don Mitchell

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Clarksburg, WV
    Posts
    1,043

    Default 8X10 Competition

    Greetings,

    I hate to to this again, but I agree with John, but probably for different reasons.

    Last year was my first year competing, and all of my images hung. Some of them didn't score as high as they could have due to a poor print job. The one that I thought would score the highest actually scored the lowest because when it was shown under the competition lights it nearly glowed. No I didn't pay a whole lot of money for the prints and I could have found a better lab, but it's all a very long story that I will spare you and get straight to the point.

    I don't mind getting beat with the learning stick, I just don't like paying a small fortune for it. All in all, I spent around $1400.00 on our state convention, that includes prints, hotel, entry fees, meals, etc;. As I've stated before, I've been very fortunate to work with some great photographers and they competed, so I can appreciate the value of doing so myself. However, I read another thread here were the discussion was basically "lack of enthusiasm". Basically, noone is pursuing their masters and other degrees and the debate was "How do we drum up more enthusiasm?" We all drive, but how many of us want to throw down a couple million to start our own NASCAR team? An 8X10 competition be a great way to introduce newer members into print competition without breaking the bank. Plus, if it was done in sitdown fashion with the judges at the table offering critique... how many wouldn't have killed for that when they were first starting out? Even if it was done for just 1/2 of a day and was limited to two years of entering, or even made available for aspiring and affiliate members only. I think the response would be great.

    By opening the door for more aspiring photographers, it would only benefit the art and profession of what we do by introducing a higher standard of quality and ethics. And wouldn't we all benefit from that?

    That's just my opinion, I could be wrong.

    Dan

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    5,479

    Default

    Probably one of the biggest mistakes photographers make in competition, and actually (come to think of it) for their clients, is the final evaluation of the print before submission. We often rely too much on the lab to print that "magical image". Part of the masters/mastering process is your ability to not only take the image, but to take charge of the fit and finish of the image. Once I figured out that piece of the puzzle, finishing my masters was relatively easy. Take the time to make sure your criteria for print competition is the right one and your prints will shine. That is was "mastering" is all about, hence the term "Master of Photography".
    Michael Gan,M.Photog.Cr. CPP,
    Meritage House of Photography

    If your business depends on you, you don't own a business-you have a job. And it's the worst job in the world because you're working for a lunatic... You can't close it when you want to, because if it's closed you don't get paid. You can't leave it when you want to, because if you leave there's nobody there to do the work. You can't sell it when you want to, because who wants to buy a job?
    —Michael Gerber
    http://www.meritageonmain.blogspot.com

  6. Default 8x10 competition

    Dan wrote "Plus, if it was done in sitdown fashion with the judges at the table offering critique"
    This has been happening at the national convention for the last two years and will happen in Austin this January. Any member can bring their images in any size (8x10 reccommended) and sit with an affiliate judge to have them critiqued. This will be happening in the print exhibit area for periods during the exhibit. Come join us.
    Buddy Stewart
    PEC Vice-chairman

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    400

    Default

    My WPPI 2nd Half Print Competition entries got two 78s and one 76. That seems about right.

    78:

    76:

    78:
    Last edited by John_Earl; 11-10-2005 at 10:10 PM.
    Photography by Earl
    www.photographybyearl.net

    Tuscaloosa, Alabama

  8. #18

    Default

    John,
    You mention having the 8x10s scanned and then projected for the viewing audience. Do you have any idea how long this process would take? Not knowing the numbers for PPA entries, but, let me use our states stastics, Florida. We have, on average, about 650 prints entered. Now, with everything staying the same, if we scanned all 650 prints, then of course you have some handling of the scanned file for sharpening and cropping, then saving. Let's say that one print takes about 1.5 minutes, from laying the print on the scanner through the final save of the image. Remember, also, that most scanners will hold just one 8x10 print. So, with 650 prints, we are looking at approximately 975 minutes for this, or 16.5 hours.
    Remember, I'm using numbers from a state competition, the number of entries from a PPA competition is much higher. While your concept is interesting, at least as far as projecting the entries, the actualities just are not feasible.
    Besides, in a few more years, with the advances of technology, I think you'll find the print competitions will be changing drastically. I foresee a time in the not too far distant future that we will be submitting files, and not prints. I actually have even worked out a method by which a full digital competition can take place. Actually, it is fascinating, and there are some definite advantages for both the judges and the viewers.
    Kirk Kief, Cr. Photog.
    Past Pres. Florida Professional Photographers, Inc.
    NILMDTS Forum Admin. http://www.NowISleep.com

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Kief
    John,
    You mention having the 8x10s scanned and then projected for the viewing audience. Do you have any idea how long this process would take? Not knowing the numbers for PPA entries, but, let me use our states stastics, Florida. We have, on average, about 650 prints entered. Now, with everything staying the same, if we scanned all 650 prints, then of course you have some handling of the scanned file for sharpening and cropping, then saving. Let's say that one print takes about 1.5 minutes, from laying the print on the scanner through the final save of the image. Remember, also, that most scanners will hold just one 8x10 print. So, with 650 prints, we are looking at approximately 975 minutes for this, or 16.5 hours.
    Remember, I'm using numbers from a state competition, the number of entries from a PPA competition is much higher. While your concept is interesting, at least as far as projecting the entries, the actualities just are not feasible.
    Besides, in a few more years, with the advances of technology, I think you'll find the print competitions will be changing drastically. I foresee a time in the not too far distant future that we will be submitting files, and not prints. I actually have even worked out a method by which a full digital competition can take place. Actually, it is fascinating, and there are some definite advantages for both the judges and the viewers.
    Sounds like the future holds some promise! Maybe if my prints won't have to be so dark I'll enter a competition, not that I'd hang anything!
    Photography by Earl
    www.photographybyearl.net

    Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Live Chat is open