Chapter 5 CPP Study Questions
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  1. #1
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    Default Chapter 5 CPP Study Questions

    Ch 5 Exposure

    Q1) An incident exposure reading for a fair skinned subject indicates f8, 1/125 at ISO 100. The next client is very dark skinned. The proper exposure for this client at the same subject position is thus:


    A) f5.6, 1/125, ISO 100
    B) f11, 1/125, ISO 100
    C) f8, 1/60, ISO 100
    D) f8, 1/125, ISO 100

    Q2) An in-camera reflected meter reading of a very light toned scene indicates an exposure of 1/250 at f8 is called for (automatic exposure mode). For a correct exposure the photographer should:

    A) press the button; the camera has done the work
    B) employ positive exposure compensation
    C) employ negative exposure compensation
    D) use a custom white balance

    Q3) which of the following exposures is not equivalent to 1/60, f5.6, ISO 100

    A) 1/30, f5.6, ISO 50
    B) 1/250, f4, ISO 200
    C) 1/500, f2, ISO 200
    D) 1/15, f22, ISO 400
    Mark Levesque, CPP, M. Photog., Cr. Photog, A.C. Ph., CPP Liaison, PPCC Judge

  2. #2
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    Q1. I note that we're taking an incident reading, but the term "subject failure" (a misnomer, but that's the "common" term) comes to mind. This one will call for discussion.
    --Elephants can swim...
    ...and very gracefully.
    Knowing that,
    I do believe
    Anything is possible for me.

    Kirk Darling, CPP

  3. #3

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    Q1: D
    Q2: B
    Q3: This one makes me feel stupid. I can't wrap my brain around the 3 different variables, without one constant. I can do it with 2 variables, but I can't with 3. I even made charts and none of them matched up. Whyyyyy??? Am I trying too hard??
    Cassandra Sullivan, CPP
    Massachusetts CPP Liason

    Cassandra's Photography
    Here & There - The Blog
    "If you really want to do something, you'll find a way. If you don't, you'll find an excuse."

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkDarling View Post
    Q1. I note that we're taking an incident reading, but the term "subject failure" (a misnomer, but that's the "common" term) comes to mind. This one will call for discussion.
    Kirk, can you define "Subject failure"? I've never heard of it - I googled and came up with nothing.
    Cassandra Sullivan, CPP
    Massachusetts CPP Liason

    Cassandra's Photography
    Here & There - The Blog
    "If you really want to do something, you'll find a way. If you don't, you'll find an excuse."

  5. #5
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    can do it with 2 variables, but I can't with 3. I even made charts and none of them matched up. Whyyyyy??? Am I trying too hard??
    Fortunately, the same terms are used between the stem of the question and the responses.

    Just jot a note for each response in terms of how many stops each factor is changing like this (examples!):

    a. -1 +1 0 (in effect, no change)
    b. +1 -2 +3 (an increase of two stops)
    c. -3 +2 -2 (a decrease of three stops)
    --Elephants can swim...
    ...and very gracefully.
    Knowing that,
    I do believe
    Anything is possible for me.

    Kirk Darling, CPP

  6. #6
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    Q1. I note that we're taking an incident reading, but the term "subject failure" (a misnomer, but that's the "common" term) comes to mind. This one will call for discussion.
    I am torn between having that discussion here or elsewhere. If we have it here, it's relevant, but will it detract from those studying and practicing? This is one of the questions I believe I answered incorrectly on my actual exam.
    Mark Levesque, CPP, M. Photog., Cr. Photog, A.C. Ph., CPP Liaison, PPCC Judge

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cassandra Sullivan View Post
    Kirk, can you define "Subject failure"? I've never heard of it - I googled and came up with nothing.

    Well, an incident meter tells you how to properly expose a gray card. That works for any subject that is within a stop or two of middle gray for all the subject tones you want to capture detail in.

    But what if the subject is wholly within the upper end of the range, such as white lace on white satin--and you want to retain the fabric texture even in the highlights? Or what if you're shooting a black Labrador and you want to maintain some detail of the dog's coat even in the shadows?

    In that case, the middle-range incident measurement may fail to give you what you want (it's actually "measurement failure," but people have called it "subject failure"). In those cases, you may have to change some factor to get the range you want.

    It might be exposure--you may have to decrease the incident setting to keep all of a totally high-end scene within the range of your materials, or you may have to increase exposure to keep all of a totally low-end scene within range. Or you may be able to change the subject lighting--specifically lower the contrast in some way.

    If there was some need to keep the background identical between clients (such as with school photography), then you'd change the lighting, not the exposure.

    The concept of this question is that because the reflectance of the subject doesn't change the incident reading, the exposure wouldn't change. But in the real world where some subjects are far from middle gray...it might.
    --Elephants can swim...
    ...and very gracefully.
    Knowing that,
    I do believe
    Anything is possible for me.

    Kirk Darling, CPP

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkDarling View Post
    Fortunately, the same terms are used between the stem of the question and the responses.

    Just jot a note for each response in terms of how many stops each factor is changing like this (examples!):

    a. -1 +1 0 (in effect, no change)
    b. +1 -2 +3 (an increase of two stops)
    c. -3 +2 -2 (a decrease of three stops)
    Thank You! I knew there was a way...I kind of had that in my head, but didn't know how to translate it...if that makes sense!

    Q3: A (right? )
    Cassandra Sullivan, CPP
    Massachusetts CPP Liason

    Cassandra's Photography
    Here & There - The Blog
    "If you really want to do something, you'll find a way. If you don't, you'll find an excuse."

  9. #9
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    D
    B
    C

    Q3 gave me a headache.

  10. #10
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    1 D

    2 B

    3 A This question should not be answer in the morning now I'm going to be thinking about this problem all day!!
    Moore Photography Inc.
    1625 South 25th St
    Terre Haute IN 47803

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