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Holly_Howe
08-07-2006, 06:42 PM
Just ran to Walmart and as I went past their photo studio, I saw a big poster advertizing for help wanted. One of the benefits listed was "Photography Certification". I'm wondering how close that comes to trademark infringement of Certified Professional Photography. The way my lawyer explained it to me (several years ago though) was if the name was close enough as to create confusion in the mind of consumers then it was considered infringement - or some other such legal term.

Holly

David_A._Lottes
08-07-2006, 08:46 PM
Hi Holly
Thanks for the heads up. I'm kinda surprised they haven't done this before now. One thing it tells me is that our certification process must be making waves around the industry. Imitation is the highest form of flattery. To be honest with you I'm not a big fan of state organizations certification programs either. It becomes redundant and confusing. I know PPA now has a program of multiple certifications and frankly I think it just dilutes the designation. I know it is supposed to seperate the disciplines but I'm certified period. Not a certified senior portrait photographer or certified wedding photographer or certified banana photographer etc. I don't think Wal-Mart certified will be much use outside their own studios. I can see them holding it over one anothers heads but so few of them work there for more than six months that I doubt that it will have much clout even in their own shops. If consumers can't distinguish between PPA Certified and Wal-Mart Certified than we are in trouble.

D._Craig_Flory
08-07-2006, 09:01 PM
Hi Holly;

The Walmart in my town has no "portrait studio". The next time I'm near a town where the Walmart has one I'll casually ask about it. Now that PPA joined all other professions that have certification, we have more clout. Once I get some info I'll talk to PPA about it.

Hi David;

The only state that I know of with their own certification is Ohio. They had it first and PPA got the idea from them. Here in Pa., we have a group of C.P.P.'s but we meet for programs and speakers. I am a liaison and proctor the exam for PPA but otherwise our state has nothing to do with it. If you know of other states, besides Ohio, that have their own certifiction please let me know.

D. Craig Flory PPA Certified, Cr.Photog, PPA C.P.P. Liaison, ASP
floryphotog@mindspring.com

Kelly_Story
08-07-2006, 09:02 PM
This may not be the place to ask this but here goes anyway. I am very new to the forum. I will graduate on Saturday with my associates degree in portrait photography. How do you go about becoming certified through PPA?

Smiles,

David_A._Lottes
08-07-2006, 09:15 PM
Hello Craig
I am a member of the Associated Professional Photographers of Illinois. I have never looked into it because I think my PPA Cert is more valuable but on the "About" page of the APPI it says they have a certification program. Now I don't know for sure but I don't think it is a study group. I think it is their own certification. Here is the link http://www.appillinois.org/html/AboutUs.php

Kelly
Send Craig a private message. He is the most knowledgeable about certification on the forum. I had no idea Ohio's certification was older than PPA's! Learn something new from Craig everyday!

KirkDarling
08-08-2006, 12:10 AM
Craig, any company can set up its own "certification" program the same way Microsoft has set up certification programs for Microsoft Office, et cetera. Anyone can become "Word Certified" or "Access Certified" through Microsoft.

It may be possible to force Wal-Mart to asterisk it with "Not associated with Professional Photographers of America" or something like that.

John_Stein
08-08-2006, 01:01 AM
I may be way off base here but I was under the impression that Certification for photographers was no longer specific to PPA that anyone anywhere can become certified now as long as they met the requirements ( Passing the test, image submission).

If I am wrong please correct me on this.

John

Don_Mitchell
08-08-2006, 01:11 AM
Having been involved on the Board of Directors during the time the Certification prograpm was revamped, I can tell you that one of the NOCA (National Organization of Credentialing Associations) guidelines is that there has to be a separation between the credential and the credentialing association. Microsoft does not run the Microsoft credentialing program. That is why the PPA Certified program had to be spun off under the leadership of a new association and was made available to non-PPA members. While PPA, through the Board of Directors, has representation on the Certification Board, it is a separate entity outside of the PPA governing body.
This being said, I am at a loss to explain how or why the current Board of Directors at the June meeting could vote to eliminate usage of the PPA Certified logo and the term PPA Certified, by September 1, 2007, in favor of the "generic" term Certified Professional Photographer or CPP. This would be like Microsoft Certified being reduce to the term "Certified Database Professional". PPA has spent millions of dollars in brand recognition and now is eliminating that brand from a very popular consumer awareness program. In addition, as of Sept 1 of this year, the recognition of PPA Certified will no longer be used in any PPA publications. The Degree recognitions will once again come first, followed by the generic term CPP.

Just a little FYI

Don Mitchell,
PPA Certified, M.Photog.,Cr.,Hon.M.Photog

George_Hawkins
08-08-2006, 01:19 AM
Just ran to Walmart and as I went past their photo studio, I saw a big poster advertizing for help wanted. One of the benefits listed was "Photography Certification". I'm wondering how close that comes to trademark infringement of Certified Professional Photography. The way my lawyer explained it to me (several years ago though) was if the name was close enough as to create confusion in the mind of consumers then it was considered infringement - or some other such legal term.

Holly

Talking about it here will not help stop infringement.

CALL PPA STAFF and inform them. A free call....
Certainly Al Hopper would tell you who to contact.

To the one who wants to become "Certified", there is a section of www.ppa.com to anwswer all your questions. A forum is not necessarily the place to get totally correct and complete answers.

George

George_Hawkins
08-08-2006, 01:24 AM
Having been involved on the Board of Directors during the time the Certification prograpm was revamped, I can tell you that one of the NOCA (National Organization of Credentialing Associations) guidelines is that there has to be a separation between the credential and the credentialing association. Microsoft does not run the Microsoft credentialing program. That is why the PPA Certified program had to be spun off under the leadership of a new association and was made available to non-PPA members. While PPA, through the Board of Directors, has representation on the Certification Board, it is a separate entity outside of the PPA governing body.
This being said, I am at a loss to explain how or why the current Board of Directors at the June meeting could vote to eliminate usage of the PPA Certified logo and the term PPA Certified, by September 1, 2007, in favor of the "generic" term Certified Professional Photographer or CPP. This would be like Microsoft Certified being reduce to the term "Certified Database Professional". PPA has spent millions of dollars in brand recognition and now is eliminating that brand from a very popular consumer awareness program. In addition, as of Sept 1 of this year, the recognition of PPA Certified will no longer be used in any PPA publications. The Degree recognitions will once again come first, followed by the generic term CPP.

Just a little FYI

Don Mitchell,
PPA Certified, M.Photog.,Cr.,Hon.M.Photog

BACK TO SQUARE ONE; WE USED TO BE CPP! Why are we being charged additional then and for what benefit? I don't get it. I thought we had some intelligent people on the board of directors?

George

Holly_Howe
08-08-2006, 01:56 AM
CALL PPA STAFF and inform them. A free call....
Certainly Al Hopper would tell you who to contact.

George

Thanks George, You are absolutely correct. However I am not certified nor plan to be at any time in the future. So I have no vested interest in correcting what might be an infraction of trademark. I noticed it and thought perhaps, if this was a cause for concern, maybe a CPP would like to pursue it and contact PPA. Thanks again for the good advice. I hope someone takes you up on it.

Holly

Betsy_Finn
08-08-2006, 01:42 PM
I may be way off base here but I was under the impression that Certification for photographers was no longer specific to PPA that anyone anywhere can become certified now as long as they met the requirements ( Passing the test, image submission).

If I am wrong please correct me on this.

John
John, you are correct. Both PPA members and non-PPA members may become certified. There is a difference in the application fee amount ($100 per year for members, $500 up front for non-members if I remember correctly).

Betsy_Finn
08-08-2006, 01:59 PM
Thanks George, You are absolutely correct. However I am not certified nor plan to be at any time in the future. So I have no vested interest in correcting what might be an infraction of trademark. I noticed it and thought perhaps, if this was a cause for concern, maybe a CPP would like to pursue it and contact PPA. Thanks again for the good advice. I hope someone takes you up on it.

Holly
Alright I did a little of my online research ;)....

Lifetouch allows their photographers to become certified (that's the company that has studios at Walmart, btw). Besides finding this comment by a former employee, I was unable to find anything about certification relating to Lifetouch -- except myspace profiles of those employed as "certified photographers with Lifetouch Studios.
I became a 'certified' photographer through Lifetouch and it did not get me squat in the real world. I started assisting an old-school medium format all metering by hand wedding photographer 3 years ago, and humped equipment, and set up lights, and sweat, and I learned more doing that in 2 weekends than in 3 years in a perfect little climate controlled studio with a remote control camera. You CAN learn the basics of posing, composition, and developing expression in a corporate studio. But you will learn nothing about lighting, exposure, or developing a client relationship. Corporate studios are just that, and if robots could zerbert, fall down, and make faces, they could be corporate studio photographers. (link to thread) (http://www.dgrin.com/archive/index.php/t-13327.html)

[I've sent an email to Al Hopper, if/when I get a response, I'll paste the results here]

Jack_Reznicki
08-08-2006, 02:04 PM
Having been involved on the Board of Directors during the time the Certification prograpm was revamped, I can tell you that one of the NOCA (National Organization of Credentialing Associations) guidelines is that there has to be a separation between the credential and the credentialing association. Microsoft does not run the Microsoft credentialing program. That is why the PPA Certified program had to be spun off under the leadership of a new association and was made available to non-PPA members. While PPA, through the Board of Directors, has representation on the Certification Board, it is a separate entity outside of the PPA governing body.
This being said, I am at a loss to explain how or why the current Board of Directors at the June meeting could vote to eliminate usage of the PPA Certified logo and the term PPA Certified, by September 1, 2007, in favor of the "generic" term Certified Professional Photographer or CPP.


Hey Don,

To answer your question about eliminating PPA Certified logo, please read the first paragraph of your own post above.

In order to make Certification more valuable and not an "association" certification, but an industry certification, like CPAs, we followed NOCA's suggestion and separated Certification into it's own entity. As such, it's no longer PPA Certified.
Why would we want to add confusion in the marketplace with competing certifications, if PPA no longer does certification?
Having a "PPA" certification would dilute the value of Certification. Rather than being perceived as an industry designation, it would appear to be only an association designation, which it's now not.

As someone involved very early on, as you were, I’m confused as to why you question this. It seems very logical to me.

Would you go to an accountant that was certified by "The Association of a Bunch of Us That Got Together to Give Each Other Awards" (Known by their acronym ABUTGTTGEOA) , or would you rather an accountant that the industry certified?

KirkDarling
08-08-2006, 04:36 PM
Hey Don,

To answer your question about eliminating PPA Certified logo, please read the first paragraph of your own post above.

In order to make Certification more valuable and not an "association" certification, but an industry certification, like CPAs, we followed NOCA's suggestion and separated Certification into it's own entity. As such, it's no longer PPA Certified.

Why would we want to add confusion in the marketplace with competing certifications, if PPA no longer does certification?
Having a "PPA" certification would dilute the value of Certification. Rather than being perceived as an industry designation, it would appear to be only an association designation, which it's now not.

Because nobody would know who was doing the certification. We know what the Bar Association is for lawyers. We know who the State is for nurses and such (does the state certify CPA? I thought so. If not, then I don't trust those buggers, either). We know about trade unions. In all those cases, we basically do have professionals creating the certification requirements and doing the certification, and we have a hazy idea of who those professionals are (at least we think we do).

So who the heck is certifying photographers, and how are they any better than a Wal-Mart certification? I'm sitting here as a PPA member having read what you've said and realizing I don't have the slightest idea who these people are or what they stand for, or what the certification means.

Microsoft may not do the actual certification for an MCSE, but I can be sure an MCSE knows Microsoft processes. I can be sure someone with a Cisco certification knows Cisco processes. What, now, does CPP actually mean?


Would you go to an accountant that was certified by "The Association of a Bunch of Us That Got Together to Give Each Other Awards" (Known by their acronym ABUTGTTGEOA)

ABUTGTTGEOA is the definition of "the industry." Who else should be doing the certification? Who else but accountants should certify accountants?

Jack_Reznicki
08-08-2006, 05:13 PM
So who the heck is certifying photographers, and how are they any better than a Wal-Mart certification?

Good question.
To me, if you are OK with a "Wal-Mart" certification on anything, then you're a loyal WM shopper. Odds are you're concerned with price over anything else.

Certification is about educating your own clients. You sort of have to do that work.
There was a previous thread where someone said they asked they prospective client, if the other photographers they were looking at were certified. The client asked "What's certification" which gave the photographer an opening to explain and educate that client. He booked the job.

Others have stated they booked clients because the clients understood certification. Will everyone? I doubt it. I don't believe that's the norm. But it does give you a marketing tool, a very powerful one, and explaining that it's an independant certification association approved nationally by the certification board, does carry more weight.

KirkDarling
08-08-2006, 05:19 PM
Good question.
To me, if you are OK with a "Wal-Mart" certification on anything, then you're a loyal WM shopper. Odds are you're concerned with price over anything else.



Jack, you sidestepped the question. If I saw "Wal-Mart Certified," at least I know who to blame if the picture is lousy.

Who is currently responsible for the CPP criteria? What organization? What is the membership? What is the URL of their website? Where can I read their mission and vision statements? ISO has a website. Where is there's?

How can I be expected to "educate" my client on the value of certification when I don't have the slightest idea of who these people actually are and what their criteria really are?

Marc_Benjamin
08-08-2006, 09:00 PM
Who is currently responsible for the CPP criteria? What organization? What is the membership? What is the URL of their website? Where can I read their mission and vision statements? ISO has a website. Where is there's?

http://www.certifiedphotographer.com/

Jack_Reznicki
08-08-2006, 09:41 PM
Jack, you sidestepped the question.

Kirk,

Sorry if it appeared that way. Not my intention. I was trying to clear it up, not add confusion.
So rather than trip over my tongue again, I asked staff at PPA to try and clarify. Al Hopper, who is involved with this, will be posting a message here shortly.

Thanks.

Al_Hopper
08-08-2006, 09:58 PM
Comments on the CPP program and who is actually minding the store when it comes to certification.

First, I want to thank Holly for giving us a “heads up” Wal-Mart “Photography Certification.” Kirk’s post about how companies use the word “certification” is right on the money. We can’t trademark the term certified, but we can and do trademark the Certified Professional Photographer logos.

Wal-Mart portrait studios are operated by PCA (Portrait Corporation of America) and it appears that they advertise a multi-level “certification program” to potential employees.

The issue with PCA’s “certification” is whether it could possibly cause confusion in the marketplace (legal term). This might give us the basis of an objection to their use of the term. We will be investigating this through our attorneys shortly.

Let me also comment and attempt to answer some of the other points made in this thread.

The whole purpose of a certification program is to give professional photographers and members a means of setting themselves apart in the marketplace. Consumers understand what “certified” means and can relate it to other certifications such as Certified Public Accountant (CPA). A consumer may not know who “certified” a professional, like an accountant, but they perceive that some group reviewed a professional’s skills and knowledge and pronounced them competent in a profession.

The Certified Professional Photographer program has significantly evolved over the last decade to make it better for CPPs, more credible as a credential and to better withstand legal challenges.

At the direction of PPA’s Board, with technical guidance from the standards established by the National Organization of Competency Assurance (NOCA, the overseer of credentialing organizations) the Certification program was revamped. Following an in-depth study of what it really takes to be a professional photographer, in terms of knowledge, skills and abilities; diverse teams of experienced and knowledgeable professional photographers were involved in developing the questions used on the certification exam. The exam is how technical competency is measured. Candidates must also have a submission of 20 “client” images be judged has being of good professional quality.

For legal reasons certification must be available to any professional photographer, regardless of membership in an organization. For this, we must allow non-members to become certified; however since PPA pioneered the development of the credential our members can (legally) get a huge discount (the non-member application fee is $500). In my 12 years at PPA it has not happened.

In order to be credible to the public and to meet potential legal scrutiny a further step in the evolution took place last year with the establishment of the Professional Photographic Certification Commission, generally referred to as the Commission. It is a legally separate entity, but is still very closely allied to PPA. The Commission is charged with the behind the scenes administration of the CPP program including research and the development of exam questions.

More information about certification and the commission can be found at http://certifiedphotographer.com. You can also navigate to it via www.ppa.com.

The specialties that were referred to in one post are “specialty endorsements.” These were developed, at the request of photographers, to give a CPP some additional marketing muscle. The concept is that if a CPP wanted to enter the high school senior market they can earn the Certified High School Senior Photographer specialty endorsement and use it to advertise their services to that specific market.

Specialty endorsements are not required to be a CPP.

Special thanks to Betsy Finn for her informative post on how to become certified. BTW – I met some of the members of the study group at the MMM Conference. We are very impressed at what all of you are doing.

There are currently just under 2,000 Certified Professional Photographers. Some successfully use certification to expand their business and tell potential clients why they (the potential client or customer) should hire them instead of the competition.

Please feel free ask questions and get further information by visiting our web sites or contact me directly.

Al Hopper, CAE (it stands for Certified Association Executive)
PPA
800-786-6277 or ahopper@ppa.com

KirkDarling
08-08-2006, 10:28 PM
So now let's go back to Don's comment:


This being said, I am at a loss to explain how or why the current Board of Directors at the June meeting could vote to eliminate usage of the PPA Certified logo and the term PPA Certified, by September 1, 2007, in favor of the "generic" term Certified Professional Photographer or CPP. This would be like Microsoft Certified being reduce to the term "Certified Database Professional". PPA has spent millions of dollars in brand recognition and now is eliminating that brand from a very popular consumer awareness program. In addition, as of Sept 1 of this year, the recognition of PPA Certified will no longer be used in any PPA publications. The Degree recognitions will once again come first, followed by the generic term CPP.

Is this true? I did not hear a "no" in what Al said. What goes in the blank:

_______________________ Certified Professional Photographer

David_A._Lottes
08-08-2006, 11:08 PM
Hi Kirk
The new Certified Logo simply says Certified Professional Photographer. I am already using it on my price lists and web site. I hadn't thought about it but I should add the PPA and APPI logos to these materials they are all related to one another. Just so you know Al does a great job of staying in touch with the certified photogs. I get regular emails from him sharing updates and information about certification and how to promote it. They aren't private messages but they are specifically designed for certified photographers. If you are certified you know his name. In his post he addressed one of my concerns over multiple certifications. In a nut shell he made sure everyone understands that these specialized certifications are not required to become certified and pointed out that they are most useful to memebers who will use them effectively for marketing. I will stick with just plain certified unless it becomes apparent to me that other certified photographers are gobbling up my market by being more targeted. With under 2000 in the country I don't think that will happen anytime soon. Thanks Holly, Kirk, Howard, Jack, Al et. all... for posting all this! Now I know I've said it before but that Betsy Finn needs some kind of coffee mug or mouse-pad or something for her "CUT THE CRAP" work on this forum. HAIL BETSY

Don_Mitchell
08-09-2006, 03:58 AM
Al
Thank you for reminding me what the NOCA acronym stood for.

I remember how much you were involved with this back when the Board of Directors recognized that a revamped certification program was essential to the continued existence of that program. I also remember when Board member Charles Strowd introduced the NOCA standards as a guideline for PPA to follow. In order to meet those standards I believe PPA was required to separate itself from the Administration of the "PPA Certified" program. That meant that PPA could no longer be responsible for the development of test questions, the actual testing, preparatory educational programs, record-keeping, image evaluations, promotion and general administrative responsibilities. This was one of the decision factors that prompted the formation of the AVA umbrella association. In the June Board minutes I see that the Certification Committee (a PPA Committee) is still charged with recruiting and maintaining certification liaisons, administering examinations, marketing and promoting the certification program, assisting with the image review portion of credentialing, as well as developing and distributing "how to" promotional pieces. Based upon what Charles presented to the Board back in 1999 and 2000, I don't see how this program currently meets NOCA guidelines.

As I remember, there was nothing in NOCA guidelines that prohibits the recognition "PPA Certified". The Board of Directors at that time engaged in extensive discussions regarding the vaious product brand certifications, including Microsoft. While not Microsoft administered, that credentialing body is still able to play heavily on the Microsoft Brand Identity.
The CPA designation, that has been touted in this thread, is administered by the various State Boards of Accountancy and proudly display that State Board brand on the certificate. The CPA program is promoted by the IACPA. Take a look at their web site and see the wealth of consumer information and member links that are available. Last year I completed my educational and testing requirements for my CRTP designation and that is promoted by the CTEC (California Tax Education Council) complete with a web site, quarterly newsletters, consumer awareness program, and legislative representation.

In addition, it was NEVER the intent of that Board to eliminate the recognition, "PPA Certified". From the day it was determined through test marketing that the old PPA camera insignia was not easily recognizable for consumer awareness, PPA became very concious of "Branding". PPA spent millions of dollars in print media advertising to promote the PPA brand to consumers. Even today, MarCom is tasked with maintaining a consistant and recognizable PPA Brand identity.

Given the above examples that meet the NOCA guidelines for credentialing, why would anyone want to surrender such a promoted and recognizable PPA brand in favor of a generic "CPP" administered by an equally generic "Certification Commission". In order to commit enough financial resources to promote "CPP" as a brand identity to the level PPA now enjoys, would be a drain on the association and counter-productive. Will the consumer decide upon a photographer who holds various degrees and honors from PPA, and International Association of over 14,000 members with award winning publications, ........... or will they be moved to purchase from a photographer that holds a designation of CPP from a "Certification Commission". If you have to rely upon the branding of a CPA in order to explain and justify a CPP, or relate to a consumer the casual PPA association to the credentialing body, there may be a problem.

My brag wall is full of plaques, certificates, merits, and Degree recognitions that all bear the PPA brand; (I display every Certification Certificate back to the one I originally earned in 1986)
These honors represent a high standard of professionalism and a valued code of ethics and conduct. That is an easy sell to my current and potential consumer. Why should I remove PPA from my brag wall in favor of a generic certification issued by an equally generic Certification Commission. In my humble opinion, a generic designation that is not backed by the strength of an identifiable Brand, could have been printed on a home computer and therefore is only as good as the paper it's printed on.

Sincerely,
Don Mitchell

Jack_Reznicki
08-09-2006, 02:00 PM
In addition, it was NEVER the intent of that Board to eliminate the recognition, "PPA Certified".

Don,

As you know it's very different sitting on the outside and being judgmental and different sitting in a room with a lot of other photographers weighing the information at hand. The board has the luxury of listening to and appraising information brought to us by marketing professionals, our staff, and others. This was a discussion on the board and after a debate, the conclusion of the board was to eliminate PPA Certified for very different reasons than you expressed in your note. As I remember, your statement about NOCA not requiring removal is not the way I remember it. I remember that NOCA said we needed to have the Certification Commission at arm's length from PPA. The board has been continually monitoring the transition and that is what we are in right now, a transition. This has taken a lot of discussion at the executive board and full board agendas. I think that you will contine to se echanges as we progress in this process.

You are very entitled to your opinions about this, but I'm afraid the board came to different conclusions. We feel the path we choose is the right one.

As you know well Don from serving yourself so well on the board, the board of directors isn't a bunch of old men with cigars in a back room. It's made up of a bunch of working stiffs, like yourself at one time. Myself, Ann Monteith, Dennis Craft, Ron Nichols, Ralph Romaguera, Sandy Puc, and all the others. Basically not what you would call shy or wallflowers. Discussions are very lively these days. We don't jump hastily into decisions that affect all the members. BTW, you wouldn't recognize the format of the board meetings. We've made changes so that discussions that need time get it fully. We've looked at how other organizations run their meetings and have adapted some very interesting changes to be more efficient with our time at the meetings.

So your statement "it was never the intention of the board" is incorrect. This very well is the intention of the board. We voted that way after due discussion.

KirkDarling
08-09-2006, 05:21 PM
So then, unlike the software certifications (such as Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer and Cisco Certified Network Professional) that are closely identifed with known names, certification for photographers will be more like that of automechanics: ASE Certified Automobile Mechanic, which is not tied to any publically recognizable entity.

Except that I can go to the asecert.org web site and find a whale of a lot more confidence-inspiring information about ASE certification. But the certifiedphotographer.com site (which I presume is the official site of the shadowy and mysterious "Professional Photographic Certification Commission"--does anyone know who they are?) is a lot more sparse.

Although the certified photographer website says "...recognized throughout the industry," the Kodak site has nothing about it (where else is a customer going to look for a second-party "industry" endorsement of the program?). There is more information on the PPCC in this forum thread than there is published anywhere else.

We can expect public confusion, and it will be necessary to build the importance of the PPCC up, which means winding down rhetoric about the PPA. It would probably help if the web sites weren't identically designed.

Witness the Wikipedia entry:

The Professional Photographers of America is the largest not-for-profit association for professional photographer in the world. In spite of the name, membership is not limited to America. Currently there are more than 14,000 members in 64 countries.

Founded in 1880, The PPA is an association that seeks to help its members advance their careers by increasing the members’ business acumen as well as broaden their creative range.

Their Professional Photographic Certification Commission is the leading certifying body for photographic and other imaging professionals in the world. They currently have over 1,500 professionals that have earned the Certified Professional Photographer credential. {emphasis mine}

Therefore, the answer to my question finally winds down to: "PPCC Certified Professional Photographer" (which sounds faintly Communist to me...the Soviet Union was the "CCCP," but that's just my personal hangup).

Al_Hopper
08-09-2006, 07:29 PM
Further CPP comments

Thanks David for your very kind comments but I have to confess that I’m not the one who sends out information to CPP members. Actually, David Mithofer on PPA’s staff is responsible for putting that message together. The content comes from various volunteers and staff members.

Betsy, you deserve more than just two complements!

Some of the points people are making are interesting and everyone is pointing out how we can improve – that is a good thing. Getting that kind of feedback is one way we can get better.

Kirk made a good point in using the ASE certification for auto mechanics as an example of a well know certification program that does not advertise who is the certifying organization. I like to use CPA as an example because very few people are familiar with the certifying body, the Institute of Certified Public Accountants. The key is that the public recognizes “Certified.”

Photography isn’t one company such as Microsoft or GM and we know that the general public understands what “certified” means. The intent of the Certification program is to provide photographers and members with a tool that they can use to showcase their professionalism to the general public, to give them a means of enhancing their marketing and one that can stand up to legal scrutiny.

That being said I can assure everyone that we are working hard to increase the value of certification to CPPs. Your suggestions are helpful and please keep them coming.

Thanks,

Al Hopper, CAE
PPA
800-786-6277, ahopper@ppa.com

David_A._Lottes
08-09-2006, 09:01 PM
Al....David.... Whats the difference :D
Just kidding, Sorry I got you mixed up. But I know I've gotten emails with your name on them to :confused: Is it the copyright action stuff? Anyway it is good stuff. - David