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ccavedova
07-18-2012, 03:52 PM
It is written no where on the Image Certification submission requirements form that you can use mannequins or dummies for image submission certification submission. Nor is it written anywhere that you cannot use mannequins or dummies for image submission certification. It shouldn't matter whether a candidate uses a dummy or mannequin or not, because as it clearly states on the Image Certification submission requirements form itself, the images "can be set up to demonstrate the required techniques". What's the difference when setting up a shot to demonstrate a lighting technique whether a live human or a dummy is used? In fact, it should be preferable for a candidate to use a dummy because then they only have the lighting technique itself to concentrate on in order to "demonstrate the required techniques". Perhaps there should be some stipulations on the allowable types of 'subjects' for image submission. It appears that there is 'hidden criteria' for image submission because apparently there are other rules 'not written' that only the Professional Photographic Certification Commission and judges know about. Take a look at the "New CPP Image Submission Requirements" form. These new requirements are the latest requirements as of June 24, 2011. If there is 'other' criteria for image submission, it would be nice if they could be posted so everyone can see them prior to submitting images. In addition, I've had judges give feedback on lighting for a 'rule of thirds' image-when the criteria clearly states-"Rule of Thirds-This image will demonstrate subject placement and organization". There is no other written criteria for lighting for a rule of thirds image. What type of lighting should a rule of thirds image be? If an image is clearly a rule of thirds image with correct subject placement, but has dramatic lighting or high key or low key lighting is it no longer a rule of thirds image? According to the Professional Photographic Certification Commission and the judges, it isn't.



Amy_Hall
07-18-2012, 05:34 PM
This subject has been discussed in another thread. My understanding is that all images submitted must demonstrate to the judges that you are a professional. And in professional images, you don't worry about one element without worrying about the others. As professional photographers we must always think about all aspects of a photograph before we take it. Therefore, to pass the CPP image review, all images must demonstrate not only a specific lighting pattern, but also your overall professional competence. At least that's how I understand it.

Ed_Sharp
07-18-2012, 06:34 PM
The test is not just about Knowing what a ratio and a lighting pattern are, but how well you can implement the knowledge in real a life professional photographer situaion. Your value as a professional photographer comes more from your ability to work with people than any technical knowledge you have. If you were opening a studio photographing mannequins I could see your point, but those dummies don't have much cash.;)
If you submit a rule of thirds image it should not only demonstrate that requirement, but you should also strive to make every aspect of the image the best possible professional image you can create. Things like expression, color balance, head tilt, clothing adjustments etc. matter. The things you call "hidden criteria" are just the basic elements that make a good professional image, and if you are submitting something to a professional panel of judges you want to send your best work.

Louise_St_Romain
07-18-2012, 10:05 PM
This subject has been discussed in another thread. My understanding is that all images submitted must demonstrate to the judges that you are a professional. And in professional images, you don't worry about one element without worrying about the others. As professional photographers we must always think about all aspects of a photograph before we take it. Therefore, to pass the CPP image review, all images must demonstrate not only a specific lighting pattern, but also your overall professional competence. At least that's how I understand it.

That is my understanding as well; you want to send your best.

:cool:

Angela_Lawson
07-19-2012, 07:02 PM
Just an FYI - as this is currently a discussion on Facebook too, the PPCC is currently meeting and this is one of the topics being discussed.

Rick_Massarini
07-19-2012, 07:21 PM
I'm just curious as to why you would want to go through the trouble of setting up a mannequin - when demonstrating the knowledge of the required lighting patterns wouldn't take more than one minute in any typical client portrait session??? It would have taken less time to create the required images than it took to write the post asking the question. It's just a matter of moving a light and taking a couple of extra frames. Just do it in your next portrait appointment - the client will not even notice the couple of extra frames and it should be no problem to shoot in less than a minute (or two at the most) if you know what you're doing. I'm not trying to sound condescending, but if it takes you more time or effort than that - then you really do need more practice in your chosen profession before sending your stuff in to become classified as a "Certified Professional". And don't fault the judges or cry "hidden criteria" if your images don't pass - if they are of acceptable professional quality and demonstrate the requirements, they'll be accepted - if they aren't of acceptable professional quality - they will not - plain and simple - no "hidden criteria" - and they're not looking for Merit quality images, just acceptable professional images.

By the way, I am NOT one of the CPP jurors, so I'm not defending myself as a judge - I'm only defending the process.