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jdportraits
07-04-2012, 01:55 AM
Hello everyone, Since they extended the deadline for a few days I was hoping to get some feedback on these 3 images. These are what I was planning to submit yesterday.

1)Hoping for Charming
2)I command you (baby image)
3)Path to home

Thanks for any feedback, especially since this is so last minute. I wasn't going to enter until someone persuaded me last minute to enter.

okumoto
07-04-2012, 10:38 AM
Hello Joshua-

I see you have some very nice images that your clients will appreciate. All images have a very good quality of light for the subjects.

The young girl: Very appealing, nice soft colors.
I am wanting to see more image on the right side of the staircase. I believe if the subject is placed dead centered, framed within the stairs, is very acceptable. Unfortunately, her head is being cut by the horizontal top stair, which is hurting the composition. Posing of her hands should be corrected, instead of curling her fingers under. I want to see more of her full length, cropping seems too tight.

Child: Nice. Good detail within the fabric.
There seems to bee more lower space which could be cropped tighter, to keep the attention on the baby's face. Also, toning down some of the lighter fabric areas would definitely help. The face should be the brightest part. Tone down the hands slightly.
The heavy dark space on the right side could use some slight cropping.

Family scene: very nice location as a scenic entry.
Question: Was there a reason not to have the family walking towards the camera instead of away? Also, the family appears to be walking off the page, instead of into the scene/page. They appear to be very stiff and posed, not animated, flowing. In the future, coordinating their clothes would definitely help bring the score up.
There is much empty (cloudless) sky/space on the to right side. I'm not familiar with the location, but possibly lowering your camera height, bringing it closer to the ground, may improve the composition as the family walks toward the sunlight, with a more dramatic skyline, less empty spaces.

You've shown you have the technical abilities, just remember some simple guidelines and apply it on competition images.
Good luck!

jdportraits
07-04-2012, 07:13 PM
Hello Dwight and thank you very much for the insight. All of your points are very specific and it's helping me understand this process which is very new to me. I will look for another image of the young girl and repost, there are others that are more full body. As for the family with their faces back to the camera, it was an image that I always personally liked because you cannot see their faces. I felt it gives the viewer an opportunity to feel that they can imagine themselves of being part of the image. Another photographer made the same comment of not showing their faces, so I'm consluding the lack of faces will most likely knock a few points.

Again, thanks for taking the time to help me understand this process. :)

Rick_Massarini
07-04-2012, 07:49 PM
I'm consluding the lack of faces will most likely knock a few points.

At the IPC, there are no numerical point scores given - there are only three scores - it's either a non accepted image, a merit, or goes in the Loan Collection.

In addition to Dwight's comments - In the first image, the brightest spot in the image is her hand, and it's brighter than the face - and you're showing the back of the hand instead of a graceful edge of the hand. On the third image, it might be stronger if you were to flip it left to right so that the line of the shoreline leads into the four people walking towards the bridge.

jdportraits
07-06-2012, 03:08 AM
Thanks Rick for the information. I did flip that image and it gave it a different feel. How did you know that? Also thanks for pointing out there are no scores at IPC.

You guys really know you stuff and it's inspiring me to want to do more in the coming years. Thanks again.

jdportraits
07-06-2012, 03:13 AM
I also redid the first image. I can't change the hands, but I was able to pull out and make it more center.

Rick_Massarini
07-06-2012, 03:26 AM
Thanks Rick for the information. I did flip that image and it gave it a different feel. How did you know that?

It's because we naturally read left to right - so leading lines that lead from left to right always feel more natural and "read' stronger.

BUT - people of Chinese, Japanese, and Hebrew/Jewish cultures read from right to left, so for people of those cultures, a right to left orientation reads stronger. I have to give credit to Dwight for telling me about the Chinese and Japanese orientation quite a few years ago - plus, I didn't know about the Hebrew/Jewish right to left orientation until just last week when I met Prof. H. Lynn Jones (an instructor at the Austin Community College) at the Texas Kerrville convention and he informed me of that fact - so I added them to the list of right to left orientation perspectives - so no matter how old we get, we're always learning from each other - considering all of the Mitzvahs's I've photographed over the years, I should have caught on to that sooner than this - but then again, for my clients, English is their primary language, with Hebrew being a second language, so they all read left to right - so ask your clients about their cultural orientation.


You guys really know you stuff and it's inspiring me to want to do more in the coming years. Thanks again.

That's why we're here - to help get you fired up about competition. Competing is the best way to learn.