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jaimerowe
05-03-2011, 09:16 PM
What is the fail rate for the CPP Exam?

After talking to several other photographers, it seems like a lot of people fail the exam.

Thank you so much!

Jaime

GregYager
05-03-2011, 09:41 PM
Jamie,
It's true that many people fail the exam on their first try but then again how much of an accomplishment would it be if the test was easy? People fail for a variety of reasons but with the right knowledge and preparation most of these can be overcome. Apply yourself to learning as much as you can about photography and the science behind it and you'll not only pass but you'll be a better photographer in the end.

As to the actual percentage that fail, I have no clue.

Joe_Galioto
05-03-2011, 09:46 PM
don't feel bad if you fail it the 1st time
I took it 3 times before I passed
of course o didn't open the book till the 3rd go
I missed it by 2 1/2 points the first try
1 1/2 the 2nd
now that was in mid 80s before digital
I imagine it's changed since then
print submission was a breeze

J_Davidson
05-03-2011, 10:02 PM
I've failed it 3 times....

11 points the first time
1 point the second time
2 points the third

I'm currently studying in a different manner for my 4th attempt.

GregYager
05-03-2011, 10:06 PM
Add this link to your study material Jill.

http://quizlet.com/2059436/certified-professional-photographer-flash-cards/

Missy50
05-03-2011, 10:33 PM
I am taking it for the 3rd time next month. I am also studying differently, sleeping in my own bed and only driving across town this time.

Marc_Benjamin
05-03-2011, 10:37 PM
Ey I passed the first time however I was barely at 75 lol. I probably lucked out on some random question!

It would be interesting to know the actual pass/fail rate.

J_Davidson
05-03-2011, 11:39 PM
Greg,

I have those. I've got them all memorized. Thank you though!

Michael_Gan
05-04-2011, 03:29 AM
I know someone who failed it 5 times. His reasoning was that he was sure that a couple of questions were right. What I had to explain to him was that there were 28 other questions that he needed to pay attention to. So, don't get hung up on the few questions you know are wrong, just get the other 28 right.

Tss1203
05-04-2011, 01:10 PM
how many questions are on the test?

Stephanie_Millner
05-04-2011, 01:31 PM
If memory serves, it's 100 questions on the test.

The best piece of advice I got... use the first 5 minutes to draw:
A) A color wheel
B) An aperture scale (2.8 to 64)
C) Shutter Speeds
D) List of ISOs

That should help you for at least half the questions!

KirkDarling
05-04-2011, 02:26 PM
If memory serves, it's 100 questions on the test.

The best piece of advice I got... use the first 5 minutes to draw:
A) A color wheel
B) An aperture scale (2.8 to 64)
C) Shutter Speeds
D) List of ISOs

That should help you for at least half the questions!

Uh, yes. It certainly helps.

One unfortunate thing for you electronic-camera-era youngsters is that you haven't spent had the full aperture, ISO (ASA), and shutter speed scales staring you in the face all your lives (unlike us fogies), so you have to go to extra work to memorize them.

Howard_Kier
05-04-2011, 03:17 PM
I didn't have a problem with the test. My problem was the portfolio review when I first attempted to certify. It took me two tries to get it right.

Brian_Dunn
05-04-2011, 04:02 PM
I once asked if merit quality prints were required for review, and someone said that the certification portfolio doesn't have to be merit quality work. True?

Tss1203
05-04-2011, 04:41 PM
I once asked if merit quality prints were required for review, and someone said that the certification portfolio doesn't have to be merit quality work. True?

True.


What's an aperture scale? Just kidding!

Michael_Gan
05-04-2011, 11:03 PM
I once asked if merit quality prints were required for review, and someone said that the certification portfolio doesn't have to be merit quality work. True? True. We're only interested in the image itself, and how it was executed for the commissioning client.

Jeff_Mason
05-05-2011, 02:35 PM
This is absolutely a must for the exam. I was fortunate to pass on my first try and I attribute it completely to the study group we formed at our local PPA guild (TAPPA). We met weekly which held us accountable for reading the material. Each person was assigned a different chapter and they were the moderator on the week we discussed that chapter.

Stephanie's advice was given to us too. The funny thing is, as you write out these things in preparation for the test it becomes engrained. I still wrote down each of the things she mentioned as soon as they gave me the test...and I referred to them several times.

I have a color wheel sticky-noted on my monitor and I refer to it a lot when I'm color correcting in PS. Skin tones too red, add a little cyan :-).

Good luck to everyone. Keep after it.

-Jeff


If memory serves, it's 100 questions on the test.

The best piece of advice I got... use the first 5 minutes to draw:
A) A color wheel
B) An aperture scale (2.8 to 64)
C) Shutter Speeds
D) List of ISOs

That should help you for at least half the questions!

Vance_Wagener
05-05-2011, 10:06 PM
I just passed this last exam cycle and can tell you that you definitely need to learn what is quoted above and how they relate to each other as well as the application of the inverse square law of light. It's not enough to know what they are. You will have to do math. While there are definitely some ambiguous questions on the test most of them were straight forward. The difference may be my experience in both worlds; film and digital. Or it maybe some people are not good test takers. The test allows you to over think and that's where a lot of people get in trouble. On multiple choice your first instinct is usually correct. In situations where there is more than one correct answer they are looking for the best answer. While one answer may get the job done the other correct answer will yield a better result. Most importantly is to relax and not psych yourself out. I passed both the written and the port review the first time out.

Christine_Walsh-Newton
05-06-2011, 02:49 AM
I just passed this last exam cycle

And congratulations to you Vance :)

jbonophoto
05-06-2011, 03:24 AM
Amy,100 questions. I failed the first time by 1 point then 30 days later took it and passed with 79. I studied the book backwards and forwards for the 30 days in between. I took Gary Meek's class at Imaging USA and that helped a lot.

Sandralyn
05-10-2011, 05:36 PM
Hi, I dont post here much, I usually do not have anything to say. :)
Anyway, I agree with writing out the charts. But my one piece of advice is to go thru and use a method to mark your questions. I used a slash, circle and square. I crossed the #s that I 'knew' the answers, circled the ones that I 'thought' I knew but wasnt sure and then put a square around the ones I had no idea. I answered all the ones I knew and then went back to the other ones. Some of the questions on my test had the answers for other questions, or at least narrowed down some of the answers. But I counted the ones I had crossed out and had 72 that I was sure of, and made the best guess on the others. Hope that helps. Good luck! (oh, and I passed my test, now Im waiting for the image review)

KirkDarling
05-10-2011, 08:07 PM
Some of the questions on my test had the answers for other questions, or at least narrowed down some of the answers.


Hmm. I hope the test writing team is checking for that and weeding those out. They should be.

Brian_Dunn
05-11-2011, 04:00 AM
A few nits to pick with the sample questions linked to in an above post. It seems that the test is multiple choice, so probably none of this really matters...

Some of the items might be brand specific. 'Follow focus' is called 'continuous focus' on my cameras, for example. And not everyone uses Photoshop.

Some are user preferences. I like to use curves for adjusting most everything. Variations? Never use it, never would have thought of it.

Light fall-off as the square of distance is only true of point light sources. It's linear from an infinite line source, and there is no fall-off at all from an infinite plane light source.

A histogram does not show the light values of every dot in the image. That could be a grayscale copy of the image. A histogram just shows a representation of the relative COUNTS of lightness of the dots, scaled to a usable size.

Paint artists use a totally different color wheel, and an RGB color wheel could in theory be RBG in clockwise rotation and still be valid, although I have two programs which assume red is hue 0 and increasing values move towards green from red.

"How can you change the brightness of the background when using flash? Change the shutter speed." Well.. If this were fill in the blank you'd get people mentioning changing the power on the background lights, since you are using flash, after all...

"To minimize facial wrinkles, this type of lighting is best Front lighting" How about 'soft lighting'?

"An SLR camera uses what to allow you to see exactly what you'll photograph? A mirror and pentaprism" Some people could have said an optical viewfinder, considering today's cameras without.

"When the additive primaries are mixed together equally, what is created? White" Or any shade of gray or black, depending on how much of the additive primaries are used.

"An in-camera reflected meter reading a very dark scene indicates an exposure of 1/250th at f/8. For a correct exposure, what should you do? Use negative exposure compensation " The first time I read this I thought that the meaning was that you wanted to bring up the lightness to make a correct exposure because the scene was 'very dark' as in 'too dark' and you wanted to make it lighter to make it more normal. Maybe it could be phrased as 'a scene with mostly dark tones'. And on an unrelated note, people using manual exposure modes won't be using the exposure compensation control.

"What would you use an ICC profile for? To send accurate color requirements to a printer." Or to calibrate any number of other things.

"How is brightness and contrast best controlled in Photoshop? Levels adjustment" Levels does black/white and gamma, but the curves tool can adjust those plus the S curve as well.

"This viewing option gives you the most accurate version of your image in Photoshop Actual Pixel view" Called 'dot-for-dot' in my image editor, and maybe other things as well in other programs. Do you have to use Photoshop in particular to be certified? I haven't use Photoshop in so many years now.

"Resolution refers to what? The number of pixels per unit of length in a image" "An 8x10 at 240 dpi will have a resolution of what? 1920 pixels by 2400 pixels" Contradictory definitions of 'resolution'.

"This light modifier can be used to highlight a specific area of the subject Snoot" Grid? A tight-beam parabolic? Fresnel?


Again, on a multiple choice question most of this won't matter much. Sorry to be such a bear.

Brian_Dunn
05-11-2011, 08:03 AM
Light fall-off as the square of distance is only true of point light sources. It's linear from an infinite line source, and there is no fall-off at all from an infinite plane light source.



I've been thinking more about this, from a practical photography point of view. In theory it may show up when you have a huge soft box right next to someone's face. You will probably measure almost the same exposure whether the soft box is one foot or two feet or maybe even four feet from their face, if the soft box is diffused enough ( add the inner panel ) and large enough. The further away, the less like an infinite plane the soft box becomes.

Meanwhile, on the opposite extreme, a focused light can have very little fall-off as you get further away, which is how a spot light or a light house can beam light out to the horizon but a bird flying ten feet in front of the beam doesn't spontaneously ignite on contact with the beam. In theory a spot light focused to a perfect zero degree wide beam will have the same brightness out to infinity. So a tight Fresnel lens beam may not change much as you move it closer and further away.

( Slightly interesting story: I once took an obscure forest road to the top of a mountain and came across several microwave beam transmitters. They were at ground level, unfortunately, and the road went right in front of some of them before continuing on the other side. I immediately backed down the hill out of the way, not wanting to be fried by microwaves, but if the inverse square law applied in this case then I'd have been crisped on the spot, saving the entire PPA from suffering through my blather. As it was, I hope I didn't block someone's 911 call at just the wrong moment! Edit: They could have been microwave receivers instead. You'd think they they'd be required to put transmitters at least 10 feet off the ground just because people and deer and such can come along... )

( As another aside, distance squared DOES pretty much apply to cell phone antennas, so please don't hold your cell phone with your finger on the antenna! )

In most cases, we're safe with the distance squared idea, because most of our subjects are pretty large compared to our light sources.

danarm7
05-14-2011, 01:06 AM
There are 100 questions on the exam and you must get 70 correct to pass. I am taking it on May 22 and am SO nervous!! I read the London book and I also read Ansel Adams' "the Camera" - I am currently working on some flash cards, but I will be checking out that link shortly! Thanks! May 22 can't come and go soon enough!

Rick_Massarini
05-14-2011, 02:01 AM
If you photograph using manual exposure with your lights, know how the aperture/shutter speed/iso relationships relate and can apply them to the distances of your lights from your subject, understand how the colors of light relate to one another, (what filters do, how they work, and which one you add or subtract to change the color of the light or the image) you should have few big problems with exam. Be sure you know the inverse square law and how moving your lights or reflectors will effect your exposure and your lighting ratios. I took the test and scored a 94 on it the first time through (I wish I could find out which six I missed). There are several questions that you can answer the best "real-world" answer or the best "text-book" answer. I suggest that you answer with the best "text-book" answer since those are probably the ones I got wrong (I answered with the best "real-world" answers).

Vance_Wagener
05-14-2011, 06:07 AM
Brian, while you may be technically correct on all points...over thinking the test is a sure way to fail.

Brian_Dunn
05-14-2011, 07:19 AM
Brian, while you may be technically correct on all points...over thinking the test is a sure way to fail.

Sure enough!

GregYager
05-14-2011, 02:00 PM
Brian, while you may be technically correct on all points...over thinking the test is a sure way to fail.

My thoughts exactly! Arguing with the test is a losing battle.

MikeChdwck
06-02-2011, 03:41 PM
Thanks for the reminder about why I stopped participating in forums.

GregYager
06-02-2011, 04:11 PM
Michael,

Only you can decide if becoming certified is worth the effort for you. I wouldn't think a spell check error caused you to fail nor do I think it takes away from the tests credibility. You have grammatical errors in your post but I don't think it takes away from your credibility.

Though it's true photography has moved to the digital age there are still people shooting on film and manufacturers are making that film every day which means that knowledge of that medium could still be considered relevant.

I understand your frustration due to travel distance for testing but keep this in mind.... You considered certification to be a vital tool and worthwhile cause in your advancement until you failed the test...at that point you declared it a farce and a waste of money. Would you have made this declaration if you had passed?

My advice would be to brush off the dust from the last test, study the areas you felt weak on and continue driving forward towards successful certification.

Angela_Lawson
06-03-2011, 01:02 AM
Michael,

Just to add to what Greg mentioned, if you contact one of the CPP Liaisons for New York, you may find one willing to come proctor the exam for you at your studio, or somewhere closer, although I must say that a 3 hour drive really isn't that bad. In most states that would be considered a reasonably close distance to drive to take the exam.

Cindi_K_McDaniel
06-03-2011, 01:45 AM
Passed it on the first try... But, like someone else here said, I'd still really like to know which questions I got wrong!

dpalme
06-07-2011, 09:47 PM
I have been looking for a color wheel that does exactly that, but so far have not found one online that I can either print out or purchase. It would be helpful when editing.

Michael_Gan
06-07-2011, 09:56 PM
I have been looking for a color wheel that does exactly that, but so far have not found one online that I can either print out or purchase. It would be helpful when editing.Don't need one. Just draw out an imaginary triangle. At the top, put Red, then go clockwise, Green, then blue. On the sides of the "triangle" put Yellow, then Cyan, then Magenta. Voila! You have your color wheel;)

dpalme
06-08-2011, 02:14 AM
LOL,
Ok got it - I guess I was trying to make this way too difficult!

dpalme
06-08-2011, 05:29 AM
For those who have iPads you can download a free app called flashcardlet and you can import the flash cards that Greg mentioned in the link above

Great way to study when you only have a few minutes

MikeChdwck
06-09-2011, 09:48 PM
Thanks for the reminder about why I stopped participating in forums.

dpalme
06-09-2011, 10:29 PM
Mike,
Sorry you feel that way - what specific outdated techniques are you talking about?

You could ask about having someone proctor the exam for you in the city, just because the CPP has not scheduled a test doesn't mean there isn't a way to make it happen.

GregYager
06-09-2011, 10:31 PM
What was it you were expecting them to do for you? Change the test to match what you know? Send someone to you to administer the exam? The certification commission has to look at the industry as a whole and administer the standards accordingly. I live in a rural community and I drove many hours to take my exam. I did this because I wanted my certification. The value I got from becoming certified was worth every dollar I spent and every mile I drove. Not everyone gains the same benefits that I have but that doesn't mean the opportunity wasn't there. I just set my mind to do my best, become certified and then make the most of that certification.

You failed the test and apparently are holding the system responsible for that. That's something I can't fix. We took the same test but our outcomes were different therefore our outlooks on it are different as well. The decision to retest is obviously yours alone to make as the outcome only affects you. You have to do what you feel is best for you.

KirkDarling
06-10-2011, 02:30 AM
The real issues are the absolutely outdated techniques being tested, and the lack of willingness to have the exam anywhere near New York City.Did you actually ask a test proctor? Did you consider talking a few other photographers into the idea? Did you consider going to a local college and suggesting it to some students? Anything to make it worth someone else's while to travel that distance?

And if you did all that and nobody was willing...then you'd have to consider that it was you who were asking for too much. Why should anyone travel three hours for you? What makes you that special?

You failed the test. But a lot of people here have passed the test, even though some may have taken it more than once. That means the problem is not the test, it's you...or nobody else would have passed.

I failed a programming test once, but my good friend passed. It was senseless to blame the test for testing things I didn't know. That's the purpose of tests.

In this case, you only had to score 70% to pass. If you're trying to argue that more than 30% of the test was outdated, I'm sorry, that dog won't hunt.

dpalme
06-10-2011, 03:21 AM
Kirk,
I like you but wow - LOL - you certainly hit hard :) Not complaining mind you and I do appreciate your candor, but it sort of reminded me of a critique I asked for once.

Don't ask for something else your willing to accept the answer!

You made some excellent points.

Btw, I just noticed your from Normal - right up the road from us.

Michael_Gan
06-10-2011, 03:14 PM
I think it's important to understand that, and maybe the candidates don't know this, is that every aspect of certification, with the exception of administration, is voluntary work. Countless numbers of certified photographers who have businesses of their own and believe in the program, have donated both their time and money to make this program fly and thrive. So, Mike, I can understand the mild flaming you're receiving because you've criticized a lot of hard working volunteers with a sense of entitlement. We certainly hope that you will continue your quest for certification and help us to improve within the system, instead of outside the system. With good leadership, you'll be surprised at how much change you can make in the certification program. Trust me on this statement.

Wolfsong
06-11-2011, 12:34 AM
I also passed on the first try, with a 77%, and I passed my image review the first time as well. I studied everything I could for years before I took the test, and I still barely passed! It was tough, but I think the over-thinking part is what got to me. I do wish I knew what answers I had right and wrong, as that would certainly be very helpful. But I am glad I passed, and I wear my pin proudly:-)

GregYager
06-11-2011, 12:42 AM
That's awesome Sarah! Put it to work for you every chance you get...on your website, Facebook, printed materials etc... It ca be a valuable marketing tool when used right.

dpalme
06-11-2011, 05:41 AM
Greg your still one helluva inspiration

Rick_Massarini
06-11-2011, 05:47 AM
Really ? Really !!!:D

dpalme
06-11-2011, 05:48 AM
You too Rick :)

Rick_Massarini
06-11-2011, 06:25 AM
The "really" was an inside joke for Greg (from our get together at Imaging). I can see that Greg is going to be a great asset to PPA - and to our profession as a whole.

GregYager
06-11-2011, 02:08 PM
I do believe in making a positive impact on people whenever I can. I'm thinking maybe I was a motivational speaker in a previous life. Now where in the heck did I put those pom poms?

On a somewhat funny note Rick, I've been working on topics to present when I speak to affiliates(I have a state gig in the works) and one of them is titled "Really? Are You Kidding Me?"

dpalme
06-11-2011, 02:45 PM
Rick,
Oh I knew what it was, remember I was there, busily talking to you while Greg was drinking away.... :) Oh wait, I was drinking and watching the Packer game while acting like I was talking to you :)

Greg is one of those that can bring an audience to its knees, either in laughter or tears...

J_Davidson
06-15-2011, 06:38 PM
To the guy who failed by two WHOLE points...

Can we talk? Seriously? How bout we change the entire CPP methodology for you, would that make you feel better?

I've taken this test three times....yes THREE! And failed, all three! That is with countless hours of studying, quizzing etc.

As for drives?

I flew to Texas to take the test, I drove an hour and 15 mins to my state convention to take the test, and then I DROVE 6.5 hours to Yakima Washington to take the test.

Oh...my fail rate?

Test 1 - 11 Points
Test 2 - 1 Point
Test 3 - 2 Points

ALL on the same version of the test.

Dude, get over yourself.

dpalme
06-17-2011, 10:30 PM
Mountain Home Idaho eh? I have family up that way Jill, gorgeous country!

Missy50
06-17-2011, 10:37 PM
To the guy who failed by two WHOLE points...

Can we talk? Seriously? How bout we change the entire CPP methodology for you, would that make you feel better?

I've taken this test three times....yes THREE! And failed, all three! That is with countless hours of studying, quizzing etc.

As for drives?

I flew to Texas to take the test, I drove an hour and 15 mins to my state convention to take the test, and then I DROVE 6.5 hours to Yakima Washington to take the test.

Oh...my fail rate?

Test 1 - 11 Points
Test 2 - 1 Point
Test 3 - 2 Points

ALL on the same version of the test.

Dude, get over yourself.

For me:
1st time 68
2nd time 67
????

I did study differently this last time (Tues), I didn't have a migraine, also slept in my own bed and the test location was only minutes away. I have no idea how I did. Last time I thought I did well! But not well enough and missed one more.

One question has been on all 3 tests. Still do not know if I have answered it correctly. Never have been able to find the answer to it. I just marked the answer that was closest to how I have always handled similar lighting.

Oh, I had a ton of film and digital questions.

GregYager
06-17-2011, 11:31 PM
To the guy who failed by two WHOLE points...

Can we talk? Seriously? How bout we change the entire CPP methodology for you, would that make you feel better?


Dude, get over yourself.

You crack me up girl. :D

J_Davidson
06-18-2011, 12:26 AM
It is pretty around here...Mtn Home isn't the "greatest" but there's some great stuff in Idaho!

Melissa, I hope you passed! I got the SAME test version 3 times in a row. I do not want to test on that test again. Blah.

Greg...I'm a No BS kinda girl. I call it like I see it. Must have something to do w/ growing up on a ranch? lol

Missy50
06-18-2011, 12:51 AM
Melissa, I hope you passed! I got the SAME test version 3 times in a row. I do not want to test on that test again. Blah.


Thanks! A % of the questions would be the same and a % were different every time. LOL! It hurts to miss it by 2 doesn't it! LOL!

J_Davidson
06-18-2011, 02:06 AM
Yes, yes it does...1 is even worse. However, I am going to take it again! I've come too far, and invested too much time to quit now. Plus I think my mentor would kick my butt.

dpalme
06-18-2011, 03:06 AM
When I was in High School, I worked on a dairy in Mountain Home for two summers. Hop fields galore! Mountains on the weekend. My uncles dad owned a cabin in Silver so we got to run up there on the weekends.

dpalme
06-18-2011, 03:08 AM
Well I want everyone to pass this year, all of us. Feel free to join in on the study group if you want.

J_Davidson
06-18-2011, 04:10 AM
That sounds like Idaho! I grew up on a ranch, and we had cattle and 1500 acres of farm ground. It teaches you lots about life.

Where's your study group?

dpalme
06-18-2011, 11:01 AM
In the certification section, it'll be starting on July 1st, running through the end of the year in preparation for the test at IUSA, you are certainly welcome to join us.

That same uncle, his father owned a ranch in Murphy, with his BLM leases he had something like 40,000 acres which out west is a drop in the bucket. Didn't know Joe all that well, nice guy I thought. The ranch was in the middle of NOWHERE! LOL but it was nice out there....great place for kids to just enjoy life, and jump over rattlers LOL

J_Davidson
06-18-2011, 02:52 PM
Oh awesome. I'll be looking for it! I'm taking some time off from studying since I studied so hard for a year, and needed a break, but once my hubby goes to Korea, I'll be on the books again.

40,000 is pretty good sized! Ah, rattlers....and electric fences, barb wire. You're making me homesick Douglas....I live in town now, and I have for the last 4 years. Its making me itch. My neighbors are entirely TOO close for my taste.