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Keith_A_Howe
10-27-2010, 06:00 PM
Print Presentation affects an image by giving it a finished look. The mats and borders used should support and enhance the image, not distract from it.


This is one of those tools we have to help our images. Placement on the background and use of negative space can improve or enhance the composition. The color of stroke we choose can draw attention to something in the image we might want to emphasize. Poor presentation can hurt an image if it draws too much attention away from the actual image. No presentation can leave an image looking unfinished. When in doubt I suggest a simple black 1/4" border on low key or a similar white or appropiate light color on high key.

Keith

Joe_Campanellie
10-27-2010, 08:30 PM
Think the biggest problem I see in this age of digital is with stroke color and width. Too many times it's too bright and too wide. Try to look at your image as large as you can to make good evaluations on this.

But...so much better than the old days of going to the art store and collecting 10 shades of a color in hopes that one would work for you. That was a tedious process that can be done in a few mouse clicks now.

And don't forget about traditional matting. I think with the popularity of pure digital presentation that what was once old...is going to become a breath of fresh air again. Maybe not right away...but maybe sometime in the near future. At least for those of us who want to continue entering prints.

Keith_A_Howe
10-27-2010, 08:43 PM
But...so much better than the old days of going to the art store and collecting 10 shades of a color in hopes that one would work for you. That was a tedious process that can be done in a few mouse clicks now.


I remember licking my thumb and wiping it on the corner of the Canson paper to see what it would look like after it was sprayed.

Joe_Campanellie
10-28-2010, 04:20 AM
Yeah...nothing worse than finding the "perfect" color...just to have it change color when you sprayed it and then have to start over again.

Plus you had to pick the colored paper out under those awful flourescent lights. Ahh...the good old days...!

Tss1203
10-29-2010, 12:31 AM
I remember licking my thumb and wiping it on the corner of the Canson paper to see what it would look like after it was sprayed.

Next we'll be saying "I remember when I used to print my images!"


How does the digital option affect presentation? Do you think it will make it harder or easier to present an image well?

GregYager
10-29-2010, 12:43 AM
I would think that digital adds limitations because it takes physical options out.

Anything presented digitally can be printed but not all presentation options can be done digitally. For example I've considered making a 3D mounted print where I mount a 10x12 print on top of a 16x20 print to add sense of reverse depth to the final work. Might not be a good idea but it's not even an option if I submit it digitally.

Tss1203
10-29-2010, 01:07 AM
I would think that digital adds limitations because it takes physical options out.

Anything presented digitally can be printed but not all presentation options can be done digitally. For example I've considered making a 3D mounted print where I mount a 10x12 print on top of a 16x20 print to add sense of reverse depth to the final work. Might not be a good idea but it's not even an option if I submit it digitally.

Agreed!!!!

Keith_A_Howe
10-29-2010, 01:13 AM
How does the digital option affect presentation? Do you think it will make it harder or easier to present an image well?

Like I've said before, I think that as time goes by we will learn just what characteristics in an image make it best suited for digital submission. Then digital will just be the media choice like watercolor paper or metallic.


I would think that digital adds limitations because it takes physical options out.

Anything presented digitally can be printed but not all presentation options can be done digitally. For example I've considered making a 3D mounted print where I mount a 10x12 print on top of a 16x20 print to add sense of reverse depth to the final work. Might not be a good idea but it's not even an option if I submit it digitally.

Greg, You can certainly do this but be aware that it might not be displayed at IUSA should it merit. If there is any doubt about being able to disply the print without risking the sfety of the other prints in the show, it will not be in the show. How could this hurt another print? Weight - the display rods will only hold so much weight and if a print gets to heavy it can fall or make the little slide brackets slip and risk knocking down the whole rod or even surrounding rods. I'm not saying don't do it, just consider how you would feel if it wasn't in the show.Maybe the effect is worth it.

Keith

GregYager
10-29-2010, 01:37 AM
Well if it merits I want it displayed so I'll definately take that into consideration. What's the lightest mounting material allowed for competition prints?

Rick_Massarini
10-29-2010, 03:11 AM
Remember, at the International Exhibit, the prints are hung three up on a "Walker rod" (a 5-6 foot fiberglass/plastic rod with four 4 inch wide plastic H shaped fittings on the rod - the rods were originally made by the Walker Display Company, thus the name). The bottom fitting is usually the only one that is screwed to the rod with two H fittings just sitting there between the prints and with one at the top. If your print is too thin, and it lands at the bottom of a rod, the weight of the two prints on top of it could cause your print to buckle - and if it buckles, it will not be exhibited. I usually recommend 3/16" GatorBoard or traditional mounting board. I would not use anything thinner than 1/8", and depending on the manufacturer, the 1/8" can sometimes be too thin. Go with 3/16 to be safe.

Another thing to remember is that no print will be exhibited that can possibly damage another print. Prints with sharp edges (such as mounted on cut metal with sharp corners or plexiglass with sharp corners and edges, or anything added to the surface of the print that could possibly damage another print will cause it to be excluded from the exhibition.

GregYager
10-29-2010, 03:17 AM
I would be mounting a metal print over metallic paper with thin spacers between the two. The metal print will add rigidity but I have no clue what their weight is like.

Rick_Massarini
10-29-2010, 03:28 AM
You might have a problem with that - we had a couple cases of metal prints that were pulled from exhibition at the International Judging this year. I'll check into it and let you know what I find out before you get too involved with having them printed. I've sent a note to the PEC chairman and I'll let you know what he says - he may even respond back within this thread.

GregYager
10-29-2010, 03:34 AM
Thanks Rick. If need be I can use a silicone trim around it to prevent it from scratching other prints.

Joe_Galioto
10-29-2010, 03:59 AM
greg,
as i understand it, this will be your first time entering.
K.I.S.S.
that's all i have to say.
joe

GregYager
10-29-2010, 04:08 AM
Yes Joe, it's my first time entering. Been shooting for 15 years though and the way I look at it I have 4 entries. Just considering something a little different for my fourth entry.

If you're not living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space.

Keith_A_Howe
10-29-2010, 04:55 AM
First of all, you can enter a print mounted on a brick if you want. It wouldn't be displayed but it is allowed. But Joe has some good advice with KISS. The thing is if the image itself is not merit worthy all the razzle dazzle presentation in the world will not make it merit. If the image is merit worthy it probably doesn't need all the extra presentation. Not saying don't do it but think about the image. Will what you are planning enhance the story you are trying to tell? The general rule on complicated presentation is if it doesn't help the print it hurts the print.

Keith

GregYager
10-29-2010, 06:13 PM
What I had in mind for this one print sounds drastic but it's actually very subtle. The only reason I considered a metal print was because I wasn't sure I could trim a standard mounted print well enough to maintain the subtlety. The image will be the attention getter with the slight addition of depth being a kicker. I'm sure I will change my mind a dozen times between now and the competition but I'm trying to consider every option out there.

Dennis_Craft
10-30-2010, 01:59 AM
Greg,

Hi, I'm Dennis Craft and I am the Chairman of the Photographic Exhibition Committee for PPA. We stopped accepting metal image entries this year as it was damaging other images they came in contact with. Keith's comments about mounting it on a brick is also not correct. The PPA web site has a list of acceptable mounting products and any image on anything else will not be accepted. We give a lot of latitude on what can be used but we need to be careful of the thousands of other entries we receive and the time it would take to handle them.

I did judge one year in West Virgina and part of their competition was any image on anything and we judged an image on a toilet seat. It was sure interesting, I don't remember how it did. My point is that at a smaller competition they can be slightly more flexible than a competition that has to handle thousands of prints in a very short time.

I hope this helps.

Dennis

Keith_A_Howe
10-30-2010, 02:23 AM
Thanks Dennis! It's news to me that there are only certain acceptable mounting materials. Could you please give us a link to the list you mentioned because I can't find it.

Keith

Keith_A_Howe
10-30-2010, 02:24 AM
Just in case there is any confusion, there is metallic paper - acceptable. Actual prints on metal like several labs now offer - not acceptable.

Keith

GregYager
10-30-2010, 02:51 AM
Thanks Dennis. I'm just going through my options. I got to see an actual image on metal today and decided I didn't like the look of it anyway. I'll make sure I only use materials on the list when we find it.

Now what am I gonna do with this brick image?

Rick_Massarini
10-30-2010, 03:02 AM
Dennis, Thanks a bunch for the reply.

You can find the information Dennis referenced in the Print Rules for the International Competition. The 2010 rules are currently on the PPA web site under the Competition heading.

Here are a couple of excerpts from the 2010 print rules... Note that the size requirements for non-masters has been removed for 2011, but the minimum and maximum sizes still apply to everyone (larger and smaller sizes present handling and shipping issues).

MOUNTING
Print entries must be mounted on a standard mount material (double weight mat board, gator board, ΒΌ” foam, or Sintra). .... No mount that could potentially damage other entries or pose a danger to print handlers will be accepted. Masonite, glass, stretcher frames or conventional frames will not be accepted.
Images of any shape and size are allowed but must be mounted on 16 x 20 mount board. Recommended mounting thickness is 1/8" to 3/8".
No material may be added to the front or back of an entry that may damage another entry.
Exception: PPA Master of Photography Degree holders may submit images of any shape and size on a mount board a minimum of 80 square inches to a maximum of 480 square inches, with the largest dimension no longer than 24".

Also... while the 2010 rules don't mention it, we had a couple cases of prints last year (or was it the year before...???) that were mounted on plexiglas that were not allowed to be exhibited - the mounts had razor sharp edges where the material had been scratched and broken to size (FYI - that's how you cut plexiglas - just like regular glass- scratch the surface and hit it). They were specially handled to be judged without damaging the other entries, and were then placed in a special cart to be returned to the maker without being exhibited.