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Brian_Price
01-14-2010, 05:37 PM
Okay, I don't understand why we need to have a stroke around our prints and all this wasted space outside. I'm not sure what it is called. I don't think that I have ever seen a competition print without it. I would never se a print with all this wasted space and I feel that it is unnecessary. I also feel that it will counted against me if I don't have it. I'm not new. I've competed for three years now and have a couple of merits. Just wondering if anyone could explain it to me.:confused:

Keith_A_Howe
01-15-2010, 07:42 PM
Look at it this way, would you be upset if you were required to enter a specific size and aspect ratio? Basically you are allowed to enter any size up to 16x20 as long as you have a minimum of 80 square inches of actual image. The maker gets to decide what size and what proportions best suit the image. The extra space around the image is just to make consisitent print size for ease of handling. And as long as you have that extra space, why not use it to your advantage when arranging the composition. If you feel a full frame 16x20 best suits your image, then by all means enter it that way. Starting in 2011 there will be no special size rules for non-masters, so you can present your images in any size or proportion up to a maximum 20x24 (again 80 square inches minimum). Yes, this will make print handling more difficult but PEC has decided the advantages to the makers outweigh the disadvantages to the crew.

The stroke - I still can't understand why so many people are so bent out of shape over a few pixels around the edge of an image. If you don't like it don't use it. Lack of a stroke does not count against a print. Somewhere on another thread someone posted that their husband - a non-photographer I think- was looking at the print show just this week at IUSA and commented that he liked the strokes because it made the print look finished. That's why we use it, to complete the print, in the same way that a frame completes a print on the wall. We can chose a color for the stroke to pull out something in the image and give it more importance, just like the color of matting you chose can enhance certain aspects in an art piece. The stroke says this is the edge, this is where the image ends. Most work can benefit from that statement or at the very least not be hurt by showing clearly where the edges are. Some images might be better without the stroke. What comes to mind would be an image where the maker wants to create a sense of what lies beyond what is seen. Where they want the viewer to imagine the rest of the scene, then maybe you don't waa to impose a definate edge to the image. So then I say no stroke is the right choice. It's completely up to the maker whether to stroke the image or not, but leaving off a stroke will not lower the score. Presentation however is one of the 12 elements, so if you choose to enter an unstroked flush mounted 16x20, then do so because it's what's best for the image, not because you just don't like strokes or background area.

As a Master, the majority of my entries have a 3 pixel stoke and a black border about 1/4" wide. I personally feel a full flush image looks unfinished, like just setting an 8x10 on a shelf with no frame. That unfinished look is also partly why I don't care for Gallery wraps. But if you like it that way, by all means, go with your gut feelings.

Keith

Joe_Galioto
01-15-2010, 09:00 PM
brian,
keith touched on this a bit.
the stroke is similar to adding matting to the frame. aside from custom framing my studio's portraits which primarily are canvas, i frame all types of artwork as well. almost everything i frame gets a double or triple mat. it's the proper way to do it and it just looks better. canvas pieces sometime get a linen liner and frame enhancer or fillet, which works similar to double matting. there are exceptions like maybe a very contemporary piece.
very few images submitted for competition will look as good without the stroking or will score as well either.
if your looking to earn merits then notice whats doing well in recent competitions.
i'd call it "bending over for the judges"
art is subjective, follow your soul. it's your choice. this audience is not ready for a madonna made from dune.
just depends on how long you want to wait for that degree.
joe

Joe_Galioto
01-15-2010, 09:10 PM
hey after responding to this thread i realized it was a "ask the experts"
can anyone post on these or just the assigned experts???
joe

Keith_A_Howe
01-16-2010, 02:48 PM
hey after responding to this thread i realized it was a "ask the experts"
can anyone post on these or just the assigned experts???
joe

Sure you can respond. The difference is that one of the moderators have to approve the post in this area.
Keith