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Keith_A_Howe
05-04-2009, 04:30 PM
On another thread a couple weeks ago there was a discussion about what is impact. I basically said that once you understand it you just know it when you see it. I wanted to give a better answer than that so I have been thinking about it a lot. For me it all starts with the lighting. What is photography but a record of light and shadow. That's what we do on the most basic level, capture light. For me personally, lighting more then anything sets the mood of an image. I could describe several different lighting conditions and without a single word about the subject matter, most of you would visualize an image in your head, you would know what that captured moment of light feels like. I have seen many average images become great through the use of amazing lighting. I have seen great images lose their ability to tell a story because the lighting choices were poor. Set down with any loan book and study the PO images themselves. Look beyond any treatment to the base image, you will see a strong statement from the lighting that sets the mood of the image. Lighting isn't the last word on impact for sure, but for me it is the first step.

Keith

Rob_Wilson
05-04-2009, 04:37 PM
On another thread a couple weeks ago there was a discussion about what is impact. I basically said that once you understand it you just know it when you see it. I wanted to give a better answer than that so I have been thinking about it a lot. For me it all starts with the lighting. What is photography but a record of light and shadow. That's what we do on the most basic level, capture light. For me personally, lighting more then anything sets the mood of an image. I could describe several different lighting conditions and without a single word about the subject matter, most of you would visualize an image in your head, you would know what that captured moment of light feels like. I have seen many average images become great through the use of amazing lighting. I have seen great images lose their ability to tell a story because the lighting choices were poor. Set down with any loan book and study the PO images themselves. Look beyond any treatment to the base image, you will see a strong statement from the lighting that sets the mood of the image. Lighting isn't the last word on impact for sure, but for me it is the first step.

Keith

Keith, I agree. I always felt that if you have great lighting and your posing is a tad off..the great lighting will help you a great deal. Even clients who don't know much about lighting will know when the lighting is special, however they won't know when it's just OK or flat.

Rick_Massarini
05-05-2009, 02:14 AM
At the Judging last year in Daytona, I took a short break from "running from pillar to post all day" and sat down in one of the Critique rooms for a while (I remember it since it was right after they rotated Keith out of the room and back onto a judging panel) and listened to Dave Swoboda and Gregg Wurtzler critique a few images. Gregg was discussing the subject of Impact on his critique - he put it quite simply - he said that Impact is the quality that makes your brain say "WOW" when you first see the image... I couldn't put it any better...

Peter_Bauer
05-09-2009, 11:54 PM
Gregg was discussing the subject of Impact on his critique - he put it quite simply - he said that Impact is the quality that makes your brain say "WOW" when you first see the image... I couldn't put it any better...

I agree that -- for me -- "impact" in judging usually means "initial reaction." In a non-competition situation, however, "impact" can also be "lasting effect" or "long-term influence." Is there any image that you saw years ago which still has an influence on what you do, how you do it, or even who you are today? If so, I'd have to say that image had an "impact" on you.

But the scoring of a print doesn't happen tomorrow evening or next year or ten years down the road, it happens "now." So, for the purposes of competition, I have to agree that "impact" usually means "initial reaction."