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MarkTurner
04-18-2009, 12:03 AM
Here's one of the images going into my competition case. The other three did well in the northwest regionals earlier this month and this one replaces the low score. I'm pretty pleased with the photo and presentation, but would appreciate any comments to improve it.

The tentative title is "In the Icy Depths". It was photographed on film inside a crevasse in the Easton Glacier on Mt. Baker in the North Cascades.

http://www.turnerphotographics.com/private/0203348_crop.jpg

-- Mark Turner
www.turnerphotographics.com (http://www.turnerphotographics.com)

John_Metcalfe
04-18-2009, 03:23 AM
Your stroke is too wide IMO and the corners are rounded on it. If you are creating it with the "layer style" method choose inside. Also not sure of the subject placement and sizing on the board.

"In the icy depths" leaves me to question a few things.

1. As viewed he seems to be "on the edge and entering" not "in".
2. The depths are cut off and are out of view.
3. If listening only to the title "in the icy depths", I would think the subject to be smaller and a lot more space. There would be overhead directional lighting and the subject to be more serious.

It is such a deep title, much deeper than the image.

D._Craig_Flory
04-18-2009, 01:26 PM
Hi Mark;

This is a great image. I do wish he was not looking at the camera but rather intent on descending in the crevasse.

I would #1 flip the image #2 crop and also make the subject layer smaller #3 move the subject layer till he is in the area of the 4th quadrant #4 put the accent line on a transparent layer making it as skinny as possible and possibly also lowering the opacity. An accent line is to provide separation of the subject layer from the background without calling attention to itself.

MarkTurner
04-18-2009, 03:40 PM
I have several other variations, including one where the climber is more distant and not facing the camera. I'll work it up later today when I have time and see what you think. I struggle with keylines and appreciate your thoughts on that. I'm not sure what you mean by "move the subject layer till he is in the area of the 4th quadrant." Also, why would you flip the image? I come from an editorial background where I just don't do that with people (flowers I'm OK with flipping).

-- Mark Turner

D._Craig_Flory
04-18-2009, 07:35 PM
I have several other variations, including one where the climber is more distant and not facing the camera. I'll work it up later today when I have time and see what you think. I struggle with keylines and appreciate your thoughts on that. I'm not sure what you mean by "move the subject layer till he is in the area of the 4th quadrant." Also, why would you flip the image? I come from an editorial background where I just don't do that with people (flowers I'm OK with flipping).

-- Mark Turner

Hi Mark;

In the western hemisphere we read from left to right. So, judges start viewing an image from the left. In most cases the main subject should be on the right so they have their gaze go across the image to it instead of encountering it right away. This is not always the case but is most of the time. And, because of words in an image it can't be flipped or they would appear backwards.

I am putting an example of the golden mean points and the 4 quadrants.

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i93/DC47/RuleofThirdsQuadrants.jpg

MarkTurner
04-19-2009, 03:52 AM
Thanks for your feedback. Here's a new version, from a different frame in the series. I've flipped the image and toned down the accent line. I think your suggestions have helped me choose and optimize a stronger image.

http://www.turnerphotographics.com/private/0203344_canvas.jpg

Any further thoughts or suggestions before I see how this scan from film holds up in printing? The grain is visible at 100% in Photoshop, but I think that's OK.

-- Mark Turner

andiegoodman
04-19-2009, 04:35 AM
The last image is much better..perhaps a title like "decending into the icy depths"

just my humble opinion

MarilynDillon
04-20-2009, 01:26 AM
I agree - I think the most recent one has more of a "depth" to it and feels more intense. I am fairly new to comp but that is my gut reaction. Do you have any noiseware for photoshop? You could run it on the file and see if that helps with the grain.