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tnhillbillytoo
02-09-2009, 03:50 AM
I just have to ask---Has the CPP exam changed?

I went through every study material I could find here on the PPA forum. Read the book multiple times and took detailed notes. Did all the online study quizzes for the book (8th and 9th editions). Studied with a colleague and we quizzed each other constantly. We took advice and questions from every photographer we knew that had taken the test. The list goes on and on and on...

I personally have been studying for MONTHS. I have all the available practice material down cold.

I took the test today. There were some of the most obscure questions I've ever seen. Questions that didn't give enough information to get an accurate answer. Multiple choice questions where all four answers were correct. Most of the study questions in this forum and in the online study guide for the book are NOT on the test. The few that ARE on the test are so simple you shouldn't even be allowed to touch a camera if you can't answer them properly. I know several people who have taken and passed the CPP exam in the last year. This test is not at ALL what they described.

I honestly do not expect to pass. Even after taking the test, I don't know what else I could have studied to know the answers to many of the questions. I have sat for the last few hours with the book trying to find the answers, but there are none.

I would love to share some of the questions, but I'm afraid that would be frowned upon so I will refrain from giving direct examples.

I'm feeling very defeated. It's going to be a LONG few weeks waiting for the results...

Barbi_Barnum
02-09-2009, 12:00 PM
watching this one to see if anyone has any insite

D._Craig_Flory
02-09-2009, 12:39 PM
It used to be that I would get a critique form to give out with the exams each time I gave it. I have not seen those for several years now. So, whether or not you passed, I suggest that you type up all you said, plus any other thoughts, and send them to Marissa Pitts at PPA. It will get passed along to the certification committee. You may also send it to my studio e-mail and I'll forward it to my friend who is high up in the hierarchy of certification. My studio e-mail is: floryfoto@evenlink.com

In any case, they do want to get feedback.

Heather_L._Smith
02-09-2009, 12:45 PM
Okay, girls, here's my 2 cents. I teach a CPP prep class and what I tell people is that there are questions on that test that are what I would consider "textbook" meaning that you can look back in the "textbook" and the wording may be very close to verbatim, and therefore easy to study for. However, there are a lot of questions on the test that truly TEST your knowledge of WHY something works the way it does. For example, if you were photographing a large group and had them divided into 4 rows, which row should you focus on to make sure they're all in focus? Well, THAT answer - or that question, for example, will not be in the textbook. You have to know how depth of field works and that there's a rule to follow in that situation that would give you the correct answer.

And, yes, there are questions where there might be multiple answers that are essentially correct, BUT, one of them is MORE correct than the others based on the tried and true rules of photography. The test wants to know that you know what the rule is, not how you figured out how to do it differently.

Does that make sense?

Trust me - I know your frustration. I was prepared for a "textbook" test, so it was harder than I expected. But, if you know your rules and know WHY they are rules, then that knowledge can be applied to the questions on the test.

Edited to add: Think of it like a driver's test. Do you remember when you were 16 and took your driver's test? I remember sitting for that test and there were a number of questions that came up where I though "I DON'T KNOW!! I'VE NEVER HAD TO DO THAT!!" Or even one question I remember that was "when stopping at a stop sign, what direction should you look first for oncoming traffic?" I remember sitting there and looking left then right, right then left and I couldn't remember for the life of me which way I should look first!!! Of course, that's a silly example, but it's kind of the same thing. The test wants to make sure you understand the practical application of the craft.

Barbi_Barnum
02-09-2009, 01:03 PM
Heather I think there is some concern about ambiguious questions on the test. Since I have not taken it I wouldn't be giving out a question off of the test...but...evidently there are some questions that run along the lines of....

If you are shooting an afternoon sporting event, what ISO should you use....
and choices range from 100 to 1000 ISO.

There are too many variable to answer that question correctly with the info given. Is the sporting event inside or outside? Is is sunny or cloudy? Is it a fast paced sporting event like horse racing or something slower like baseball. Are you interested in freezing the action or capturing the whole playing area? Are you shooting with a Rebel XT or a 5D mII? What lens are you using and how fast is it? How will this image be used? Are you producing work that you know will only be printed as a 5x7 or will the work potentially be a wall canvas or larger?

See where I'm going with this? There is no right answer to that question with the info that they give you. From what I understand there are many questions on this test that are along the lines of this. No matter how well you understand the info and can apply it, the test design plays a huge factor in success.

Erin_L._Clark
02-09-2009, 01:03 PM
For example, if you were photographing a large group and had them divided into 4 rows, which row should you focus on to make sure they're all in focus? Well, THAT answer - or that question, for example, will not be in the textbook. You have to know how depth of field works and that there's a rule to follow in that situation that would give you the correct answer.



Edited to add: Think of it like a driver's test. Do you remember when you were 16 and took your driver's test?

So what was the answer? Which row? :D

I must be older than I feel, I do NOT remember that test! lol. :eek:

George_Hawkins
02-09-2009, 01:59 PM
I like Heather's post!
Let me add that it's a multiple choice test; use "process of elimination".
If it's a choice between two, take a stab and select the better.
When I took it, there were many definite no or yes answers, but also many toss-ups. Lots of "gray". I heard the same thoughts when I was administering the test. My best suggestion is not to panic.

D._Craig_Flory
02-09-2009, 02:39 PM
Edited to add: Think of it like a driver's test. Do you remember when you were 16 and took your driver's test? I remember sitting for that test and there were a number of questions that came up where I though "I DON'T KNOW!! I'VE NEVER HAD TO DO THAT!!" Or even one question I remember that was "when stopping at a stop sign, what direction should you look first for oncoming traffic?" I remember sitting there and looking left then right, right then left and I couldn't remember for the life of me which way I should look first!!! Of course, that's a silly example, but it's kind of the same thing. The test wants to make sure you understand the practical application of the craft.

Hi Heather;

I remember very little about the (1st time) I took the Pa. Drivers Test. That was, after all, something like 45 years ago. ;) I passed the written part but flunked the test in the car. After we were back the Pa. State Trooper asked me if I knew why I had just flunked the driving part and then told me i went through a stop sign without stopping. I told him I saw no stop signs that I didn't stop for at which he informed me that there was a "stop" painted on the parking lot macadam. I told him our drivers ed teacher never told us anything like that was legal. So, ignorance of the law is no excuse.

I don't know how that helps those about to take the exam other than "if you never heard about it before take a guess".

Dave_Cisco
02-09-2009, 02:44 PM
Okay, girls, here's my 2 cents. I teach a CPP prep class and what I tell people is that there are questions on that test that are what I would consider "textbook" meaning that you can look back in the "textbook" and the wording may be very close to verbatim, and therefore easy to study for. However, there are a lot of questions on the test that truly TEST your knowledge of WHY something works the way it does.

That's what a test is supposed to do.:D

Stephanie_Millner
02-09-2009, 04:39 PM
Interesting. I took the test in October and it felt as fair as anything anyone's explained to me during preparation. I felt, for the most part, that the questions were well written - I do remember maybe 10 questions total that were really frustrating to me. Specifically for the reasons that Barbi mentioned. I remember one question, in particular, dealt with what type of reflector you'd use in a certain situation - however the situation didn't give enough detail about the subject's relation to the light source.

I definitely dwelled on these few questions way longer than I should have, but I was usually able to eliminate at least 1 answer. So you are giving yourself a 33% chance instead of a 25% chance. Eliminate 2? 50/50. (Can we tell I just did 4 months of studying for standardized testing? haha) That said... if you counted up how many you KNEW you knew - I'm sure you did better than you think! :) Worst case scenario? If you do have to take the test again - you know all the questions!

tnhillbillytoo
02-09-2009, 05:15 PM
I was NOT expecting test questions verbatim from the book. I was expecting questions that gave enough variables that I could be reasonably sure I was choosing the correct answer. I should not have to guess and hope I could read the test author's mind.

Louise_St_Romain
02-09-2009, 06:00 PM
Interesting. I took the test in October and it felt as fair as anything anyone's explained to me during preparation. I felt, for the most part, that the questions were well written - I do remember maybe 10 questions total that were really frustrating to me. Specifically for the reasons that Barbi mentioned. I remember one question, in particular, dealt with what type of reflector you'd use in a certain situation - however the situation didn't give enough detail about the subject's relation to the light source.

I definitely dwelled on these few questions way longer than I should have, but I was usually able to eliminate at least 1 answer. So you are giving yourself a 33% chance instead of a 25% chance. Eliminate 2? 50/50. (Can we tell I just did 4 months of studying for standardized testing? haha) That said... if you counted up how many you KNEW you knew - I'm sure you did better than you think! :) Worst case scenario? If you do have to take the test again - you know all the questions!

This was the impression I had as well when I took the exam (also in October :) ). How it was written actually reminded me of the tests I took at Toyota for product knowledge and sales certification; quite often there would be more than one correct answer, you just had to pick the most correct one.

Michael_Gan
02-09-2009, 06:23 PM
OK, let's also take this in this perspective. Certification is not about book knowledge. We all know that some can take tests, and some can't. We also know that book smart is not necessarily application smart. This is where all of this comes to play. The original concept of certification is that all working photographers with working knowledge of the basics, plus real world applications of professional practice, should pass the certification standards.

That is, just because a question has several "correct answers", it's really the correct answer that is the one that suits actual working conditions. Now in the case of the ISO question, I can see where some of you will be concerned because, with digital, you then have an "ISO noise" problem. This will be some of the updates that the commission (an independent group outside of PPA) would address. But if you have to rely on this one question in order to pass, then you have far greater problems in taking the exam. Bottom line is to not over think this stuff based on the book. If you have been practicing pro photography for quite some time, many of these answers will make more sense for you.

The previous requirements for certification used to be this:

"You must have been in full time practice for at least 2 years."
"You must provide copies of State, Federal and local (if applicable) licenses"
"You must provide 3 references from other studio's in your area"

The exam used to be 130 questions in which you had to get 80% correct. This included Photographic History, Darkroom, commercial lighting, Business practices, and View Camera (a whole section of questions for each).

The commission wasn't even as close to as sophisticated in writing the questions either (I would guess that we all got into photography because we all sucked in English at school).

These were the parameters in 1983 when I first certified. Passing gave me the right to announce to the world that I was one of only 75 certifieds in the country (imagine, less certifieds than Master Photographers!)

I can't imagine what would happen to certification if we kept all of these standards in place ;)

jenniferfeeney
02-09-2009, 06:28 PM
I have not taken the test (yet). But I used to write portions of the tests for the American Dental Association and consulted for the Radiological Society of North America on the test-writing procedures. There are several different levels of test questions (relying on three different cognitive domains)-- some rely on you to be able to just spit back the answer, others rely on your taking the information and applying it to a situation. Even these more advanced questions have two levels--being given a rule and applying it to a situation is different from being given data, interpreting the data, and then applying it to a situation.

And if you take Barbi's sample question above (shooting a sporting event on a sunny day), this is a perfect example of an application question. You know the "sunny 16 rule", you know the shutter speed needed to stop fast action, you know equivalent exposures, you know how ISO is related to exposure. You should be able to apply all of this knowledge to get the best answer. The test writer is not trying to TRICK you. Just making sure that you know the information in application.

Edit: Here's something else I just thought of. Don't analyze the question based on the equpment you have in your bag, but base it on what a professional photo covering that type of event SHOULD have. There are lots of variables, but you know there will be action, you know that you probably won't get really close (unless they run you down on the sidelines :-), and you know that there are sporting events that have low light. As a sports photog you are going to have a zoom (at least 200) that opens as wide as posible (f/2.8). Unless they bring in equipment as a variable in the question, assume that you have it (at least, that's what I would do).

George_Hawkins
02-09-2009, 07:24 PM
To add to Michael's informative post.
They had a "pool" of questions from which there were a bunch of different exams made. The monitor/administrator passed them out. Examinees did not know the differences when they talked over questions later.

Kimberly_Hill
02-09-2009, 09:42 PM
I can't imagine what would happen to certification if we kept all of these standards in place ;)

I would have skipped certification and gone straight to Craftsman. ;)

Barbi_Barnum
02-09-2009, 10:33 PM
But Jennifer that's my point. To answer the question you assumed that it was a sunny day and you had average equipment. IF this test is designed to accept more than one answer as correct then, yeah, they had some answers that would fall into the correct range. A skilled photographer would know their equipment and be able to evaluate the lighting situation and choose the ISO that best fit that situation and gave you a trade off of noise acceptability. But a well crafted testing instrument does not factor in assumptions.

And the idea that if you are relying on this one question to make or break you on this test then your problem is bigger than the test isn't very fair either. If this was the only question that was ambiguous on the test I doubt anyone would be as concerned as they are after leaving the test. If it was just a matter of this one item on the test people would be laughing and saying...wow, can you believe that one question.

In all fairness I haven't yet taken the test. However, some people that I know that were well prepared with both book knowledge and practical application knowledge have left the test in shell shock. I can't imagine anyone preparing any better for a test than they have. They have years of experience leading up to this and dedicated studying in the months prior to the test. I'm just saying that perhaps they have a point that some of the test questions were poorly crafted.

George_Hawkins
02-09-2009, 10:44 PM
I would have skipped certification and gone straight to Craftsman. ;)

Michael can likely do a better job writing.
Being Certified Professional Photographer means so much more to the consumer than Craftsman or Master degrees. Correlate it to hiring an accountant or a certified public accountant.

Marketing that one is certified is all how one makes it. Certified renewal requires continuing education in most industries and in this; Craftsman does not. A group of CPPs can more effectively market together.

One could go on. Craftsman requires 13 speaking merits and 12 achievement merits obtained by attendance or serving as specific officer.

In the end, it's one's decision in what sequence to pursue the letters after one's name. Some do Masters before Craftsman; a while ago, CPP was required before being Master.

samgardnermcr
02-10-2009, 01:57 AM
Hi all,
If you want some practice test questions which resemble the real test, please email me at sam@samgardnerphotography.com and I will send them to you. The test is not perfect by any means, but 80% is very realistic. Yes, many of the questions rely upon actual field experience, not book learning! Perhaps people need to obtain some more actual experience in a wide variety of settings, especially with the benefit of mentors, prior to expecting to pass a certified examination for professionals..
Sam

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 02:17 AM
Barbi,

I did start by assuming a sunny day, but you can work back from sunny 16 (f/16, 1/125sec, ISO 100) and realize quickly by opening up your aperture you can stay at the shutter speed necessary to stop action with a long lens (even if it is overcast) and still use ISO 100. Granted, I don't know exactly how the question was worded. Plenty of standardized tests are written poorly - in the consulting I did for the Radiological Society of North America, I had Ph.D Physicists writing the worst test questions I have ever seen. The questions they had me work on were ones in actual tests--the students did very poorly. So it may be that the questions were not written the best. But most people are completely floored by application questions. They are not all bad. Just make you think - and under pressure that can be tough!!!!

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 03:15 AM
Perhaps people need to obtain some more actual experience in a wide variety of settings, especially with the benefit of mentors, prior to expecting to pass a certified examination for professionals..
Sam

What a novel idea.........:D

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 03:20 AM
But most people are completely floored by application questions.

Hmmmm,
You mean that to pass your CPP, you need more than memorization skills? You actually need experience? .....That must really suck for some.:)

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 03:39 AM
What a novel idea.........:D

Finding a mentor can be difficult because not everyone wants to share what they know (I might take your business :-). There are two well-established photographers in my area that have helped me some, one who is more open than the other, but both very cautious about their knowledge. Most of what I known is from going out into the trenches...I donated my time to the Salvation Army to shoot a NCAA basketball game and learned very quickly about quick your reflexes must be to shoot sports (and how heavy a 5D with grip and 2.8/70-200 can get :-). The editorial assignments I get have taken me to Joffrey Ballet (no flash allowed), indoors, outdoors, all sorts of lighting combinations, things you are not prepared for like the fact that the tall building in Chicago you THOUGHT would block the sun for your outdoor shoot at 11AM is just a few feet in the wrong place, etc. I'm learning on my feet and ultimately not from a mentor. Fortunately I have not crashed and burned!

There are many newbies that complain about the lack of mentors...there are many potential mentors that complain about all of the newbies threatening their business and how dare they ask for mentoring!...PPA is a great place for gaining knowledge--there are so many on this forum who are willing to share. Ironically, there seem to be complaints from some PPA members that too many newbies with no prior experience are joinging PPA to learn (aren't you supposed to be a professional BEFORE you join?). It's a tough situation for many...

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 03:49 AM
Most of what I known is from going out into the trenches...



You will not just survive, you will thrive.:D

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 03:52 AM
Hmmmm,
You mean that to pass your CPP, you need more than memorization skills? You actually need experience? .....That must really suck for some.:)

Actually, application questions in a standardized test are difficult for even those with much experience. There are three different cogitive domains in test develpment that rely on different parts of the brain. I just pulled out my test development materials for this -

Recal of knowledge, Problem Solving, and Use and Interpretation of knowledge. Each of these three rely on a different thought process. And while practical experience is certainly a must, some still have a tough time taking a scenario on paper and using critical thinking skills to work through to the answer in a standardized test. It is a thought process (and study skill) you must LEARN and practice just as you must practice photography.

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 04:02 AM
You will not just survive, you will thrive.:D

Or I'll go down with the Alamo trying! :D

Rick_Massarini
02-10-2009, 04:25 AM
There are many newbies that complain about the lack of mentors...there are many potential mentors that complain about all of the newbies threatening their business and how dare they ask for mentoring!... there seem to be complaints from some PPA members that too many newbies with no prior experience are joinging PPA to learn (aren't you supposed to be a professional BEFORE you join?). ...

I know of very few studio owners who have problems with mentoring the next generation of PROFESSIONAL photographers. Those who are PPA degree holders promise to pass on their knowledge to the next generation as part of accepting the charge to degree recipients.

Where many studio owners have problems is in passing on their knowledge to some of the crop of "new professionals" who are NOT legitimately licensed business owners. There are many people who buy a camera, have business cards printed and are instantly "in business" without first having applied to the local and state governments about licensing and the requirements regarding the remittance of collected sales taxes. There are a lot of "new professionals" in the market who are charging and collecting sales taxes but never remitting them to the government agencies for whom they were collected (because every business must collect sales taxes, it would not look professional to NOT collect taxes on sales) - these people are stealing from the taxpayers since they are not remitting the sales taxes to which the state and local governments are entitled and require to provide police, fire and other services to the public. If these people are legitimately in business, and complying with all the legal requirements of a legitimate business, then their fellow professionals will generally welcome them into their circle of friends, but there are many unlicensed photographers out there trying to (pardon the expression) "steal" business away from the legitimate professional businesses who are complying with all of the required sales tax requirements of their areas. These are the people who will continue to have difficulty in finding a mentor within the ranks of the true professionals.
Sorry about the hijack -

Kimberly_Hill
02-10-2009, 10:17 AM
Hmmmm,
You mean that to pass your CPP, you need more than memorization skills? You actually need experience? .....That must really suck for some.:)

This attitude is EXACTLY why I didn't bother to post. I have practical experience, I have 2 PPA board members as my mentors, and I didn't expect the test to be regurgitated text from the book. When I had very little trouble answering any question from the book, online, here on the forum, or on test prep materials and knowing why I gave that answer, and then felt flummoxed during the test itself, I think that's cause to be taken aback.

Barbi_Barnum
02-10-2009, 10:52 AM
Wow it's unfortunate that this thread turned so prickly. Very sad.

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 12:36 PM
I know of very few studio owners who have problems with mentoring the next generation of PROFESSIONAL photographers. Those who are PPA degree holders promise to pass on their knowledge to the next generation as part of accepting the charge to degree recipients.

Where many studio owners have problems is in passing on their knowledge to some of the crop of "new professionals" who are NOT legitimately licensed business owners. -

With all due respect Rick, that is NOT the case. There was just a lengthy thread about people who are not yet professional, not pretending to know what they are doing, asking to to be allowed to intern or assist professionals with the hopes of becoming one themselves. The resounding response was "why would I give them my time if they will be a potential competitor?" There was also the thought that those looking for mentoring ought to pay for it. Not the traditional intern where someone works for free for you in exchage for knowledge...but paying for the knowledge. Being new myself, I can tell you there is a definite undercurrent of negativity towards us. (and yes, I have a business license, belong to my local chamger of commerce, am an LLC, pay sales tax, have business liability insurance, and file my taxes with the IRS).

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 12:42 PM
Now, back to the CPP test - as with most standardized tests, many would benefit by a class on how to take a standardized test. There is a formula (so to speak) for determining which answers are distractors to narrow it down to the correct answer. Because, like it or not, answers are formulated to look the same. Wrong answers often look correct on purpose. No, you shouldn't have to learn HOW to take a particular type of test--you should be tested on your knowledge itself and that should be enough. This is just an inherent flaw in all standardized tests.

Mark_Levesque
02-10-2009, 12:46 PM
Kim-

I am wondering if the test changed so drastically since I took it, or if there is some other explanation. When I wrote up the sample questions and posted them here, they were representative of what was on the test I took. I am not sure how much the individual tests vary from one to the next, and since I only took it once, I have a sample size of one. It's possible there is a significant variation between the tests, and maybe I just got lucky that the particular test I got asked the questions that I knew. If this is the case, you should be able to retake the test and get a mix of questions more in line with your knowledge base, and do fine the next time.

It sounds like you felt prepared going in, but found the test more challenging than expected. That's not a very comforting feeling. I would say stick with it. You can do it.

tnhillbillytoo
02-10-2009, 01:41 PM
Mark, I'm going to respond both with and for Kimberly since she is sitting right beside me.

We really appreciate everything you did putting those questions together. We definitely learned from them. We appreciate your thoughtful response to this thread even more (the fact that you didn't assume that we #1 weren't legitimate businesses, and #2 that we expected to pay our $100 and be handed our certifications without any work).

This thread has gotten really nasty. ALL we are saying is, we were really, REALLY prepared for the exam. We studied the book until we can practically recite it. We both have years of experience behind the camera. Admittedly, we have less studio experience than some, but we DO have experience in the studio. We are both well rounded photographers. We don't object to needing the knowledge in some of the questions (the sports one for example) even though we will probably never use it, but we DO object that people automatically assume that we are NOT professionals because we're saying, "Wow! We were really prepared, and that test was WAY harder than we ever dreamed it would be."

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 03:10 PM
Just a general observation...nothing personal intended.:)

Rick_Massarini
02-10-2009, 05:58 PM
Wow it's unfortunate that this thread turned so prickly. Very sad.

I'm not trying to be prickly or negative - nor are my remarks directed towards anyone on this forum. I was just providing input as to why some of the "mentors" may not wish to help newer photographers. We have had to deal with some of these same issues just recently within our state. We had several unlicensed individuals apply for membership in our state association, one who told us that she was collecting sales tax and putting it aside, but did not have a tax ID number nor a license...duh... And we also had a person who was not a member of our state association using our name on their website and MySpace page as "professional credentials". This is why I posted the reply that I did. It was not aimed towards anyone in particular, just information provided to possibly give an explanation as to why some studio owners are a bit reticent to help some newer entrants into the field.
Now back to the CPP...

Michael_Gan
02-10-2009, 06:13 PM
One of the things about forums, and especially this one, is that we have a mixture of members here from long timers to newbies. The biggest problem with that is that the long timers have a tendency to feel an "ownership of these boards" and the newbies aren't quite familiar with the "culture" of its members. Compounding the problem is that we can't tell exactly, truly, what type of personalities each of us really have.

I made a joke at the OurPPA get together that the reason it was so quite at this party was because we'd all have to text message each other to feel comfortable! :D

So, while things may seem "prickly", it wouldn't after you've known these cast of characters for a while. Although we try to keep these characters at bay from time to time, we're getting rather used to the antics. Just keep in mind:

Everyone here on these boards who are regulars do have a lot of heart in mind when they say something here. They really do want to help. Many of us have somewhat poor writing skills (I would guess that's why we're photographers:)), so we ask that there be some leniency in our writing styles.

So, I need the newbies to calm down, and I need the veterans to go a little easier cause' I really don't want to slap hands, tell everyone by PM to play nice, or close this thread. OK?

Michael
Forum Moderator

Heather_L._Smith
02-10-2009, 06:16 PM
Mark, I'm going to respond both with and for Kimberly since she is sitting right beside me.

We really appreciate everything you did putting those questions together. We definitely learned from them. We appreciate your thoughtful response to this thread even more (the fact that you didn't assume that we #1 weren't legitimate businesses, and #2 that we expected to pay our $100 and be handed our certifications without any work).

This thread has gotten really nasty. ALL we are saying is, we were really, REALLY prepared for the exam. We studied the book until we can practically recite it. We both have years of experience behind the camera. Admittedly, we have less studio experience than some, but we DO have experience in the studio. We are both well rounded photographers. We don't object to needing the knowledge in some of the questions (the sports one for example) even though we will probably never use it, but we DO object that people automatically assume that we are NOT professionals because we're saying, "Wow! We were really prepared, and that test was WAY harder than we ever dreamed it would be."

Hey, girls... I really don't think there was anything negative actually directed at you personally. I don't think anyone was assuming you weren't a legitimate business or anything like that. Some of us use sarcasm, which doesn't come across nearly as humorous on a forum as it may in person. It looks like you both are fairly new to the forum, but let me assure you that the folks on here are good people - and here to help.

For example, Dave (Cisco) usually gives one-line answers in his posts. Someone who hasn't been around that much might think it's rude or mean... but it's not. It's succinct :)

Good luck with the test scores... you will probably be pleasantly surprised.

Heather_L._Smith
02-10-2009, 06:17 PM
I posted at the same time as Michael.... yeah, what he said.

jenniferfeeney
02-10-2009, 06:26 PM
By the way...What is considered passing on the CPP Exam?

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 06:32 PM
For example, Dave (Cisco) usually gives one-line answers in his posts. Someone who hasn't been around that much might think it's rude or mean... but it's not. It's succinct :)

Good luck with the test scores... you will probably be pleasantly surprised.

Yeah, I look a lot different in person.:)

BTW, If I remember correctly, I passed my CPP with 2 points to spare.

Heather_L._Smith
02-10-2009, 06:32 PM
70 or higher (out of 100 questions)

Dave_Cisco
02-10-2009, 06:50 PM
I believe 80 out of 130(or 120) when I took it.

Erin_L._Clark
02-11-2009, 08:16 AM
One of the things about forums, and especially this one, is that we have a mixture of members here from long timers to newbies. The biggest problem with that is that the long timers have a tendency to feel an "ownership of these boards" and the newbies aren't quite familiar with the "culture" of its members. Compounding the problem is that we can't tell exactly, truly, what type of personalities each of us really have.

I made a joke at the OurPPA get together that the reason it was so quite at this party was because we'd all have to text message each other to feel comfortable! :D

So, while things may seem "prickly", it wouldn't after you've known these cast of characters for a while. Although we try to keep these characters at bay from time to time, we're getting rather used to the antics. Just keep in mind:

Everyone here on these boards who are regulars do have a lot of heart in mind when they say something here. They really do want to help. Many of us have somewhat poor writing skills (I would guess that's why we're photographers:)), so we ask that there be some leniency in our writing styles.

So, I need the newbies to calm down, and I need the veterans to go a little easier cause' I really don't want to slap hands, tell everyone by PM to play nice, or close this thread. OK?

Michael
Forum Moderator


Thanks Michael- TOO Funny about the comment. So true. :-)

as a newly certified PP- I can say that I fully expected to fail after taking the written exam. I was shocked when I didn't honestly. I did not go through the text book as well as I would have liked to-barely at all really. I was thankful I started out learning the 'old' way- manual and darkroom knowledge helped me answer many of those questions. Most of them, I went through and answered by process of elimination. When we started the test- we were informed that MANY of the questions will have several right answers, our job was to pick the BEST answer for the situation. So I chose what *I* would have done... seems it worked.

Patty_Fox
02-13-2009, 04:37 AM
I, too, think (and hope), that you will be pleasantly surprised to find you passed the exam. And again, as someone said, if not, then next time (asap), you will know what is likely to be on it. I would write down (and Kim, I know you already have) all the questions (and answers) you can remember now, just in case.

You should get your results very soon. Mine came about a week or so after the exam.

tnhillbillytoo
02-25-2009, 10:22 PM
After all the stress (and the drama in this thread LOL!) the results are in...

I PASSED!!!!!! I scored 88%. I'm still in complete and total shock.

I'm sure she will chime in soon, but Kimberly Hill passed as well!

Thanks all!!!

~Michelle Parsley

Kimberly_Hill
02-26-2009, 12:06 AM
Chiming in! 85% for me. Now on to the image review :)

Thanks to all who took the time to share their viewpoints, write sample questions, and critique images.

Michael_Gan
02-26-2009, 12:11 AM
Congrats you two! Way to go!

Now, what was all the fuss about?....;)

Dave_Cisco
02-26-2009, 12:14 AM
Congratulations to both of you...the beginning of great things.:)

Mark_Levesque
02-26-2009, 12:41 PM
Hehehe. I have one word for you ladies: validation. No, I lied. Another one: congratulations! :)

tnhillbillytoo
02-26-2009, 10:16 PM
Thank you!

Ashley_St._Germain
03-12-2009, 08:53 PM
Hey Kimberly,

I just sent you a private message. Just letting you know in case you miss it. (I let one sit in my inbox for a month or so before I saw it) opps

Kimberly_Hill
03-12-2009, 11:55 PM
Thanks for the heads up! I would've missed it :)

Patty_Fox
04-06-2009, 02:29 PM
I knew you would do it!

Congrats!


Chiming in! 85% for me. Now on to the image review :)

Thanks to all who took the time to share their viewpoints, write sample questions, and critique images.

Cheri_MacCallum
04-06-2009, 03:03 PM
First of all! Congratulations to all that passed!

Second of all, with all the confusion and misunderstanding...remember that 97 percent of communication isn't the words we say (or type)! It's the body language, facial expression, voice inflections...etc., that tell the real story. So before getting upset, remember that in "type" we miss a LOT of the actual communication and what we "read" may be mis- interpreted because of all these other missing elements!