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Tiffany_Schmitt
10-22-2008, 12:31 AM
I really didn't think I was going to get anyone signing up for my Super Monday course and low and behold, I now have 6 people signed up....Yikes. I don't know what I was thinking. Guess I had better start working on a course. This is not something I have ever done and now I am wondering what I was thinking.:eek:

Any suggestions? I am so far behind in work right now on top of it.

My Super Monday is for beginning studios and the beginning photographer.

I plan on doing a survey here tonight and sending out to everyone to see where they stand, but that is the only idea I have....

Help?

Tiff

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-22-2008, 12:33 AM
On a side note though...I just got back, 'bout a half hour ago from our Fall state convention where I entered prints for the first time and was amazed at the results.

78, 80, 82 and 84 and got a 78 and an 80 on my senior folios. Guess that makes me feel a little more confident. :)

Tiff

Karen_Linsley
10-22-2008, 12:42 AM
Hi Tiffany; I know how you feel. I also have more signed up than I thought. I sat down and wrote out a sylabus the other morning, and yesterday when I got my roster I emailed it to everyone. But I'm a bit nervous, this is my first class!

If your class is for beginners, I would start with the basics: a basic shooting/posing/lighting session. You could go over how to measure light, what kind of light to use, different kinds of poses, how to use aperture to control depth of field, that kind of stuff. Then you could do a segment on studio operations and pricing.

After I got my sylabus written out, I wrote out a sheet of info I'm going to hand to them. It has resources on it. My class is on wedding workflow, we are going out in the morning on a shoot. I have a model, we are going to be doing off camera lighting, reflectors. Then in the studio I am going to take them through my workflow, with everything projected. So my resources sheet will have all the equipment and software listed, plus places to get actions and presets, plus it also has PPA info, and info about forums. I remember getting a resource sheet from someone years ago that I took a class from and it was very helpful, so I did one too!

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-22-2008, 01:08 AM
Oh my gosh, thanks Karen. That does help. Now can you send me more time???? I fear this will take me longer than it should to get ready.


I just hope that I can help these people that are coming to see me as much as other speakers have helped me! OH the pressure.:o

Tiff

Rick_Massarini
10-22-2008, 01:20 AM
I don't understand why you would sign up to present a program that you had not yet written ???

Lori_Clapp
10-22-2008, 02:06 AM
Don't you have to know what program you are doing before it can even be offered? What does it say you will be teaching?

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 11:40 AM
Relax and take a deep breath Tiffany. Congrats on your comp prints. Look, your opening up your studio for people to see and your available to answer their questions for eight hours. That's over an hour per person. What would you charge a client for an hour of your time? Your a volunteer not a paid speaker, PPA members who attend get a merit to boot. So for a hundred bucks these folks get to look inside your operation, pick your brain for EIGHT hours, network with five other photographers and they get a merit. If they think thats not worth it.............good luck to them ever feeling they got their moneys worth for anything. It cracks me up to hear people who want to charge a thousand dollars an hour to their clients complain about donating a hundred bucks to PPA for all they get in return on Super Monday. It's on Mondays because a lot of studios are closed on Monday anyway and PPA knew that would be the best day of the week to avoid lost income. Their hundred bucks, their milage and their meals are all a tax write off. Only your business clients get to write of a session fee. If you honestly feel guilty about ONLY donating your time, blocking off your own schedule you could have booked and letting six other photographers poke around your business then do a PR headshot for each of them and buy them a pizza for lunch. Sad thing is some of them actually think it's worth three times that much to put in the pocket of someone who stands in a Marriot with a script and shows them only what they want them to see, telling them only what they want them to hear and loading them up with other junk to buy when they leave. Go figure :rolleyes:

Keith_A_Howe
10-22-2008, 03:08 PM
PPA members who attend get a merit to boot. So for a hundred bucks these folks get to look inside your operation, pick your brain for EIGHT hours, network with five other photographers and they get a merit. If they think thats not worth it.............good luck to them ever feeling they got their moneys worth for anything.:
David you make some really valid points, but I think you are leaving some stuff out of your scenario. Those attendees are not just paying $100. And to suggest that the speaker doesn't owe them much because they are just volunteering, that's not quite how I see it. The attendees are investing a day in thier life. How much is a day in your life worth? And what would you expect to get in return if you invest that day? The speaker is being paid just not in dollars. They are getting paid in the faith of those attendees, faith that what the speaker has to say is worth 8 hours of time. I think if you sign up to offer a Super Monday or any program, you have an obligation to do a thorough job, to be prepared and to have something worthwhile to share. That's just being ethical. Just letting people spend 8 hours in your studio asking questions is not enough. By signing up as an instructor you are accepting the responsibilty of trading something valuable for a day out of people's lives. If you can't provide that value then don't sign up for the job. (Tiffany, I am not speaking to you - just talking generally.)


Sad thing is some of them actually think it's worth three times that much to put in the pocket of someone who stands in a Marriot with a script and shows them only what they want them to see, telling them only what they want them to hear and loading them up with other junk to buy when they leave. Go figure :rolleyes:

I will be the first to say I don't like speakers who talk the talk without being able to walk the walk, but I think this speaker trashing thing is getting old. When I give a full day program I will miss at least 3 days (two days travel and one day there) I could be the studio. So say I did 3 seniors each of those 3 days which would be pretty normal in the summer and early fall. 9x$1300( my average) = $11,700 income I would potentially lose. I get $1000 for a full day program. The real names in this business get more. I don't have anything to sell, but if I did do you think I could sell $10,000 worth of books or Cd's or DVD's or whatever? Could you fault me for trying considering what I gave up to be there? Everybody complains about speakers selling stuff but nobody talks about how much business they lost to take the time to be at the event. If you don't like it, then don't buy it - simple as that. I never saw a speaker hold a gun to anyone's head and make them buy stuff. Maybe that speaker your referenced at the Marriott does get paid a big fee. But thier greater experience (as opposed to a first time speaker) makes what they have to say carry a lot more weight and be worth more investment. I have to pay a lot more for an experienced pro in any occupation then I do for a beginner. I would much rather hear a program on say how to market family portraits from someone who has a proven track record, then from someone who has been in business just a year or two. There are a few self serving money hungry speakers out there, but I think the way speakers are getting condemed lately is just as distatsteful as any other predjudice. Don't pass judgement on them all based on the poor choices of a very few.

Keith

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 03:24 PM
I can't disagree with you Keith but I could flip the top and bottom. Super Monday instructors give up a day of their lives don't they? I'm as tired of Super Monday bashing as you are of speaker bashing. It wasn't that long ago that most photographers wouldn't even tell you where they had their printing done much less open their doors for a day. As for volunteers still having a responsibility to others I agree, Mother Theresa was a volunteer and I'm sure she took some guff from some lepers once in a while. Doesn't mean she should have quit volunteering. ;)

Stephanie_Millner
10-22-2008, 03:32 PM
Congratulations on those scores, Tiffany! 4 outta 6 are 80 and above? Awesome job!

And I'm totally in your boat. My program WAS written (kinda)... then I decided I hated it and am starting over from scratch.

Keith_A_Howe
10-22-2008, 04:00 PM
I It wasn't that long ago that most photographers wouldn't even tell you where they had their printing done much less open their doors for a day.
I have been in this business for 31 years and it's never been that way around here! Maybe people just don't like you?;) LOL! Seriously, it has always been open and sharing like this in my area. That's why I feel such an obligation now to pay it forward, because of the people who were so helpful to me 30 years ago.

I am not bashing Super Monday or the volunteers who give the programs. (I don't think I've ever heard any of the Super Monday speaker bashing you are refering to. Was that on this forum or elsewhere?) But I also think about why they volunteer. It's not just about giving back for many of them. They get a service merit towards whatever degree they are pursuing. It's also a way for them to get started as a speaker if that's what they are aiming for. It helps them develop name recognition if they do have aspirations of selling some products to photographers either now or in the future. There is nothing wrong with any of that. They get something they want and PPA gets thier volunteer services for a day. Win-win. But your original post to Tiffany sounded like you were saying "hey, you are volunteering your time, you don't have to put any real effort into this because you aren't getting paid. The people who come should be grateful just to be there." I don't believe that's what you really think but that's how it read to me. My whole point is that if you willingly sign up to give a program just should feel a personal obligation to do your best, regardless of what you are being paid.

Keith

Keith_A_Howe
10-22-2008, 04:02 PM
Tiffany, I apologize. I was thinking about my conversation with David and I totally missed your print scores. You did extrememly well, especially for a first time out! I hope you share your prints either here or in the competition thread. We all want to see.

Keith

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 04:29 PM
Maybe people just don't like you?;)

HA....you're probably right......This reminds me of the old Dan Ackroyd/Jane Curtain point counter point routine (Dave you ignorant hack!):D

You know it's funny I kinda do believe that just being there to answer questions is valuable enough if the skill level is appropriate. I've been to more than one program that sailed right over my head and would have been much more useful to me if the instructor had just taken questions and answers from the peanut gallery. Frank Carricio (spelled wrong I'm sure) is a master of light and a huge talent but when he would start rambling about film curves and such I would start day dreaming about doughnuts.

Anywho...I have heard in private conversation and somewhat on this forum that Super Mondays are bad for state and local affiliates because they provide an economical alternative to conventions, I have heard that the instructors are getting their Craftsman to quickly by participating in Super Mondays and I've heard that Super Mondays are just a shame way for PPA to make some extra bucks. Seems Folks around me aren't as friendly as they are in Nebraska. I clearly remember being read the riot act by a photographer for having the nerve to ask who did his printing. He was a PPA Master and life member of his State organization. Maybe he just didn't like me.;)

Now for the counterpoint....I LOVE SUPER MONDAY! It's affordable, targeted and accessible. I was going to them before they gave merits to go. I like the diversity, it's way better than a convention where you have fewer speakers on fewer topics. It's easier to get to. Almost anyone can attend one anywhere in the country. Great for isolated people to get out from under their rock once or twice a year. And I know of no more economical education opportunity in the profession.

Ok your turn Keith......You overachieving establishment crony. ;)

Heather_L._Smith
10-22-2008, 05:16 PM
I'm in the other boat... great program, but no participants! Apparently nobody in Georgia wants to get Certified!

There's always next year.

Oh, and David - it's funny that you mentioned Super Mondays as a way to get to your Craftsman too quickly... only problem is that you can only do 2 a year, so at that rate, it'd still take you y..e..a..r..s to earn a Craftsman that way! I don't care if you earn a Craftsman in 10 years or 10 months... it's still a lot of hard work! (said with the greatest of adoration... and from someone who hopes to have their Craftsman in the next year...)

Oh, and Tiffany - I don't know about anyone else, but I LOVE class participation. Especially with a class size that small. If you can come up with some activities or something to get folks out of their chairs, it's a great way to 1) keep them awake, and 2) keep them engaged. Discussions are a good tool, too, if you get talking about a specific topic and they can chime in with what they've tried or are thinking about trying - then you can give your 2 cents based on your experience. (one caveat - they can take a lot of time if you let it get off topic... so be careful!)

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 05:25 PM
you can only do 2 a year, so at that rate, it'd still take you y..e..a..r..s to earn a Craftsman that way!

um...thats four merits a year, you could get thirteen in 3 and a half years doing nothing but Super Mondays. I know that sounds like a long time but in "Dave" years, that's like a weekend. I have socks older than that. :eek:

Heather_L._Smith
10-22-2008, 05:28 PM
um...thats four merits a year, you could get thirteen in 3 and a half years doing nothing but Super Mondays. I know that sounds like a long time but in "Dave" years, that's like a weekend. I have socks older than that. :eek:

Hahahaha! Of course, that assumes that someone actually signs up for the class that you've prepared!

Andrea_Chapelo
10-22-2008, 06:34 PM
I'm in the other boat... great program, but no participants!


Now that's the kind of class I would like to teach ;):D

Stan_Lawrence
10-22-2008, 06:40 PM
"You know it's funny I kinda do believe that just being there to answer questions is valuable enough if the skill level is appropriate."

I have to disagree with my learned colleague.....most beginners don't know which questions to ask. If you're going to agree to put on a seminar, be prepared. Since I so rarely agree with Keith ;), if one is going to put on a super monday, one really should have the session planned from beginning to end. :cool:

Michael_Gan
10-22-2008, 06:49 PM
OK Tiffany, so you are committed to do this. Congrats on the 6 sign ups. That's probably more than the average of all the Super Monday programs.

So, scolding you for not being prepared is not the issue anymore as some have suggested. You need to get on a fast track to offer the best value for your students.

1. If you do know who your students are going to be, get on the phone, or email them and ask them, "What would you like to get out of this class?". Many times, you can put a workshop together by tailoring it to their needs. For example, Leslie did this with a volunteer workshop in our association. She asked all 20 people what they would like to learn. ALL of them said "Inspiration". So, she concentrated on her program on just that.

2. Start with you basic premise that is outlined in your course description. Nothing is more worse than not delivering what your course descriptions suggests - great way to get bad reviews. Start your workshop off with information that is useful to your students, BUT, don't give them the farm just yet because:

3. You need to know the difference between a program and a workshop! A program is where you spill your guts out to the general audience. A workshop is interactive. Give them something to do. Create exercises, for example, developing a price list, developing a business plan, developing a marketing plan. Heck, just those three alone will carry you throughout the day.

4. Don't, whatever you do, apologize for being unprepared. If you are, they will have known it already. Concentrate on things they can take home with them and all will be right with the world. I would suggest dedicating a full day to putting together your course outline for the day. Many times, the interaction alone will carry you throughout the day, and this is where you here of some of us saying "When we teach, we learn something for ourselves as well".

And this is a good thing!

Good luck and have fun!

Keith_A_Howe
10-22-2008, 07:00 PM
You know it's funny I kinda do believe that just being there to answer questions is valuable enough if the skill level is appropriate. . . . Frank Carricio (spelled wrong I'm sure) is a master of light and a huge talent but when he would start rambling about film curves and such I would start day dreaming about doughnuts.

Ok your turn Keith......You overachieving establishment crony. ;)


If you are Frank Cricchio then just answering questions might be enough. (I still feel he would have an obligation to be prepared for a program he willingly signed up to present) But people of Frank's caliber are RARELY seen giving Super Mondays - they are all down at the Marriott!:D

As far as over achieving - well maybe stamina is more appropiate then over achieving, if you keep pegging away long enough, eventually you rack up a few accomplishements. My credintials are probably more a result of longevity then talent.

Keith

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 07:10 PM
if one is going to put on a super monday, one really should have the session planned from beginning to end. :cool:

Well sure....I'm not talking in generalities. I'm talking about Tiffany's program. She has six people coming for a beginners program and she's not prepared. I think she can still do a nice job by simply conducting a Q&A program. Some may want picture taking help, some may want pricing help and some may want help with photoshop. She will have enough time to cover all the bases. If she just starts setting up lights without asking and talking about facial analysis she may loose h er whole audience. If she's real lucky she may find out in the first fifteen minutes that they all want help with the same thing. Then she can turn it into a round table and have everyone on the same page by lunch. Don't let them get to you Tiffany, you'll be fine. Just find out what they want and help them all you can.

Given the opportunity to see Stan & Keith put on a show or just sit and ask them questions for and hour I'd take the hour everytime. As soon as I asked them how much to charge for an 8"x10" they'd know what a long hour it would be. :D

Stan_Lawrence
10-22-2008, 07:35 PM
"Given the opportunity to see Stan & Keith put on a show or just sit and ask them questions for and hour I'd take the hour everytime."

The challenge is you might very well get way more info listening to our "show". There is always the opportunity to ask questions, especially with an intimate audience. :cool:

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 07:39 PM
you might very well get way more info listening to our "show". :cool:

Are you kidding I'm always outside smoking during the good stuff. I swear they wait for me to leave on purpose! :mad:

Rick_Massarini
10-22-2008, 07:47 PM
I agree completely with Keith. I attend Super Mondays on a regular basis, but I generally do not attend them in my area. I pretty much know what the local people are doing, so when I decide to invest time in a Super Monday, it generally involves traveling to another area to attend one. I live in New Orleans, but I have flown to Texas to attend many Super Monday programs with speakers like Dave Cisco, Terry Spearman, Rick Staudt and many others. For me, attending a Super Monday involves a day to fly there, an overnight hotel room, a rental car, and a day to fly back - so once you add up the airfare, car rental, hotel costs, and three days out of the studio, the $100 to attend the seminar is the smallest part of the cost. I really believe that before you advertise that you will be giving a Super Monday class, you should have something valuable to share - not just the opportunity to spend time in someone else's studio - heck, I can go visit another studio any time I want to, or go to a local guild meeting that is held at a local studio. A Super Monday program is probably more costly for the attendees than for the presenter. Signing up to give a Super Monday just to get a couple of speaking merits is just not the right thing to do, and signing up to give a program with the expectations that no one will attend is just poor planning. Remember - people WILL and DO travel to attend Super Mondays - I do - and that cost to the attendee should be respected by the presenter in that they should have valuable information to share and be prepared. Just my opinion.

Anne_Raker
10-22-2008, 07:59 PM
Are you kidding I'm always outside smoking during the good stuff. I swear they wait for me to leave on purpose! :mad:

Quit smoking, and you won't have this problem! :D

*ducking* *running*

David_A._Lottes
10-22-2008, 08:19 PM
Well put Rick
That's the great thing about Super Mondays. If you have the time and resources to attend an expert level course in a neighboring state you can do that. If your only lucky enough to be able to take one day away from work put half a tank of gas in your car and take an entry level course on posing seniors you can do that to. Last time I gave a Super Monday I was the only wedding program in the State. I know darn well plenty of people could have given a better wedding program than me but without me there would have been no wedding program at all. My students learned things, I learned things, PPA made a couple of bucks and a couple of kids got their first merits. One guy had never used the RAW setting on his camera before, he had never even seen a RAW file before. He had his camera with him so we improvised that into the program. Just getting him to capture some RAW images and open them up in DPP was worth the cost for him and worth giving up my day for me. He couldn't believe the adjustments he could make. Now it doesn't take an expert to show people simple stuff like that. Just some willing volunteers.


Quit smoking, and you won't have this problem!

Yes Mother. :o

Anne_LeBouton
10-22-2008, 11:15 PM
Deep breath, Tiffany, your going to do fine! :D

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-23-2008, 02:10 AM
Wow, lots of discussion on this one....

First off....


I don't understand why you would sign up to present a program that you had not yet written ???

Last spring I was the lucky recipient of the 4 day learning experience from our Spring convention. After going to one that was helpful in some ways I got to thinking on my way home and thought 'I can do that!' I was so excited about the thought of helping other people when I got home there was an e-mail asking for Super Monday instructors. So I signed up. Making sure that it would be a beginners course because I feel there is a lot that I can help with that. I do at every school and convention that I go to so why not....Guess I should have taken the time to sit down and write a lesson which would probably take quite some time to do and then signed up, but we all know that wouldn't have happened. I guess I am the kind of person that says 'Yes, I can do that' and then I figure out how to. That is the way I do everything. Just me. I'll think twice about it next time. Of course then there probably won't be a next time....

FUNNY THING IS....PPA sent me the wrong roster and I actually didn't have anyone signed up. I do have two now that are going to sign up on Monday when they get there and they are people that I know fairly well so I won't feel under as much pressure but it will be a great learning experience for all of us...

I appreciate all the comments and take them all to heart as I go forward. I would love to teach in some capacity sooner or later. I did not sign up just for the merits as I didn't even know you got them when I first signed up, but I will be working for the Masters degree and that is part of it. I just want to help. I have gotten so much from so many others.

Thanks for all the info everyone and I hope to just go up from here. If I do decide to sign up again I will be sure to have a course written up before signing up.

Thanks again, Tiffany

Dave_Cisco
10-23-2008, 06:07 AM
I think she can still do a nice job by simply conducting a Q&A program. :D

This is so wrong...6 hours is a very long time for an unprepared teacher to stare at students who will exhaust their list of questions in 30 minutes.

Mark_Levesque
10-23-2008, 01:49 PM
Ok, so a program for beginning photographers and nascent studios. This sounds pretty easy to put together if you take a half hour to organize your thoughts, and then create the program from that.

What do you need to run a studio? Imaging skills, and business skills. So I would spend the morning on how to create images (knowing your camera, camera techniques, basic photoshop) and the afternoon on how to run a studio- management, marketing, setting up pricing, choosing the products you want to sell, etc. There's more than enough material to choose from. You can offer a VERY jam packed course full of good information and still not cover it all. The hardest work would be not in coming up with enough material, but in distilling all of the potential material to the essence of things that you need to know. Now get your backside in gear and get it done. :)

David_A._Lottes
10-23-2008, 02:42 PM
This is so wrong...6 hours is a very long time for an unprepared teacher to stare at students who will exhaust their list of questions in 30 minutes.

But Dave, look at your reply. It's like one line long. Look at my replies.:D I could spend four hours on the first students first question and the other four hours on the next student first question. :o OK...I give. Obviously as Tiffany has said she won't do one of these unprepared again and that's a good thing. Thanks for having the guts to be honest about it Tiffany this was a fun thread. :)

Dave_Cisco
10-23-2008, 04:14 PM
But Dave, look at your reply. It's like one line long. Look at my replies.:D I could spend four hours on the first students first question and the other four hours on the next student first question. :o OK...I give. Obviously as Tiffany has said she won't do one of these unprepared again and that's a good thing. Thanks for having the guts to be honest about it Tiffany this was a fun thread. :)

I luv you, man.:D

Keith_A_Howe
10-23-2008, 04:40 PM
Guess I should have taken the time to sit down and write a lesson which would probably take quite some time to do and then signed up, but we all know that wouldn't have happened. I guess I am the kind of person that says 'Yes, I can do that' and then I figure out how to. That is the way I do everything. Just me. I'll think twice about it next time. Of course then there probably won't be a next time....

Thanks again, Tiffany

Tiffany
Please don't say "there Probably won't be a next time..." even joking! It plants that thought into your mind and will make it harder to overcome in the future. I do not mean you have to "write a lesson", simply come up with the topic and make a list of the points you want to cover. This outline is all you need before committing to the program. It will give you a road map to prepare for the program as it gets closer. It will give you advertising points for newsletters, PPA and even the forum.

I don't want you give up Super Mondays or speaking in the future, just go into them with a plan and not put it out publicly that you are unprepared. Doing so reflects on you and your program. You don't know who might be reading it from this forum and decide "well if she is unprepared I'm not going". It can also plant the idea that everyone who does these programs does not prepare. David said he is tired of super Monday bashing - but when he said "Your a volunteer not a paid speaker" he created the perception that Super Monday speakers don't need to put as much effort into as a paid speaker should. That could be interpeted as a less than positive comment about the caliber of Super Monday instruction.

FWIW - I was never addressing my comments about preperation to you. As long as you are ready to go the moring of your progarm, I don't care if you planned the week before or six months before. (You should of course have that outline or list of bullet points at least mentally thought out before you sign up.) I was not and am not at all concerned that you will do a great job. I never ever got the feel that you were treating this too casually. My whole discussion was directed towards David's suggestion that a question and answer session was plenty. I was speaking philosphically not about your particular situation.

Keith

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-24-2008, 03:45 AM
Thanks Keith,

I didn't think you were basting me at all, I actually thought you were helping me out. And I truly appreciate all your comments. You are so valuable here.

Ever since I signed up for the Super Monday program I have always had it in the back of my mind. When something would come up or someone would ask me a question about something I would file it away albeit mentally. I did have some ideas about what I wanted to do.

I remember when I was first learning and always remember what things were important. Especially the little things and the basics that are so important. Especially when you don't know them!

I am sure I will try it again. I don't learn lessons too fast;)

And I do agree with you about putting things out there...that is one lesson I learned. Although it did make for some great and interesting discussion. :D

Thanks for all your input.

Tiffany

Kim_Larson
10-24-2008, 05:47 AM
Hey Tiffany! I think you should post your prints that merited :) I didn't get a chance to see them this last weekend :P

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-24-2008, 02:33 PM
Yeah, they didn't have them out for very long did they! I'll try to do that this weekend. Trying to catch up and prepare. :o

It was great to meet you and hope to see you at some Indianhead meetings?

Tiff

Kim_Larson
10-25-2008, 01:26 AM
Hopefully, their meetings conflict with another group I'm involved with on the web design end of business...but I should get on the mailing list or something, I'm sure I can ditch out on one of their meetings on occasion.

Tiffany_Schmitt
10-25-2008, 02:53 AM
Our next meeting is Nov. 17th with Jon Allyn as our speaker. Not one you would want to miss. Plainfield, WI

Hope to see you.

Tiff