PDA

View Full Version : Some CPP questions...



Kari_Douma
09-03-2008, 04:48 PM
I am new to PPA, and I have made it a goal to get my masters and CPP. So, I am wondering how fast I should try to do this. I am going to Imaging, and I am wondering if I should take the exam there. I am considering the pre convention class that is offered to help prepare for it.

Let me give you a little background...
I bought my first SLR camera 7 years ago, knowing nothing. The first two years were spent learning the basics of Photography. The next two years were spent trying to get a business going, and learning digital. The next 3 years were spent trying to fine tune everyting and take every area of my photography to the next level. (That is a constant goal of mine... there is ALWAYS room to grow.)

I am very good with technical details, however I have not had any formal training. Everything I have learned has been self taught, mostly from the internet, some books, and I have gone to workshops. I joined my local and state PPA affiliate groups to learn.

So, when I look at taking the CPP test, I am worried about a couple things. I did not use film very much, so I don't know a lot of the things about film or film filters, or Medium or Large format. Because I am mostly self taught, some of the lighting terminology doesn't register with me. I know how to get the results I want to get, but things like "rembrant, broad, short, ect..." I will need to study more.

I just ordered "Photography" by London and Upton to study.

So, back to my original question...
Being that this is my first year in PPA, should I just go and enjoy the convention? Or, should I try to study between now and then, and take the test while I am there? Any thoughts?

BTW, I have started earning my Merits already...

Cassandra_Sullivan
09-03-2008, 04:58 PM
Well once you register to get certified, you have 2 years to do it. You can take the test and do the image submission as many times as you can fit in 2 years. It doesn't' cost any extra to do either...so I say go for the test at IUSA and if you don't pass, then by taking the test you'll at least have an idea of what areas you need to work on.

Kari_Douma
09-03-2008, 05:09 PM
Thanks Cassandra. Is there any tips on what they are looking for as far as the image submission goes? I had a friend who passed the test, but not the image submission. Do I submit the images first, or do I take the test first?

D._Craig_Flory
09-03-2008, 05:22 PM
Hi Kari;

I suggest that you wait to take it. Enjoy, and learn, as much as possible at Imaging. Then, you can take the exam at a Michigan Prof. Photographers meeting or at Mid-East Regional. Or, you could come take it with me at one of the PPAofPa meetings.

I also wanted to make sure you knew that one of the very best one week schools in the country is Triangle Institute of Photography which is held once a year in the Pittsburgh area. They offer excellent speakers and courses which can help you progress.

Heather_L._Smith
09-03-2008, 05:23 PM
Kari -
You can do it in any order you wish. Image submission is only done quarterly, with the next one in November (I think). I would encourage you to take the test at Imaging - worst case, you know what you need to study for the next go-round. Best case, you pass on what you already know (and can study between now and then). I'm not sure when MI offers their testing, but you can check that out on the certification site of PPA. I think the most critical thing is to pick a date and work toward that - whether that date is during Imaging or during your next state convention or whenever, but pick a date and work toward it.

Technical terms are definitely going to come in to play, so the book you've ordered will be a huge help there. Just being able to "do it" and get the results you want won't quite be enough to get you through the written exam - you need to know and understand why things work the way they do. Think of it this way - the written exam is going to test your knowledge of the subject via multiple choice questions. The image submission is your "practical" exam, if you will. Like your driver's test - there's a written and a practical. Same deal here. I looked at your website and you've got some good stuff... now it's time to bring the practical and the technical together. Like I said, the Photography book will be a great source of information for you.

Mark_Levesque
09-03-2008, 06:02 PM
Kari-

I would not hesitate to take the exam early. As others have stated, you really can't lose. Definitely get the London book. It doesn't have to be the latest edition necessarily. the 8th is fine. You are going to want to become familiar with the technical terms. Don't worry too much about film; that was my big concern when I took the test and it was a very small portion of the test. Do know what the various processes are and what chemicals perform which actions. You should know what fixer is, but you don't have to know the name of Kodak's. You should know the order of processing, and what the side effects are of spent developer, etc. Just a general knowledge of what is done is sufficient.

Where you really need to spend your time is on color theory, lighting, exposure, and be able to translate any given exposure to the same EV with a different aperture, ISO, etc. If you can do that backwards and forwards you will be very happy indeed. :)

There are practice test questions in here that would be useful to see where you are in your studies. It would be nice if they were stickies or at least a pointer to each thread were a sticky, but that's above my pay grade. :)

Good luck. You will find it's well within your ability; you simply need to put in the effort.

KirkDarling
09-03-2008, 06:22 PM
You should know what fixer is, but you don't have to know the name of Kodak's. You should know the order of processing, and what the side effects are of spent developer, etc. Just a general knowledge of what is done is sufficient.


Here is a hint: The correct answer does not depend on a proprietary product or application. The difference between correct and incorrect responses will not hinge on knowing the difference between Photoshop and Paint Shop Pro or something that is a feature soley of Photoshop.


Where you really need to spend your time is on color theory, lighting, exposure, and be able to translate any given exposure to the same EV with a different aperture, ISO, etc. If you can do that backwards and forwards you will be very happy indeed.

Yes, theories and "equations."

Someone ought to build a little slide rule of apertures against shutter speeds. This is where we oldtimers had an advantage over the "digital generation" in the same way that people who learned to tell time on an analog clock had an advantage over kids who learned to tell time on a digital clock.

On the old cameras, we always had the full ranges of apertures and shutter speeds staring us in the face. Two clicks of one in one direction of exposure adjustment equalled two clicks of the other in the opposite direction of exposure adjustement.

Maybe a useful learning tool would be a kind of sliderule of apertures against shutter speeds. Or find an old Sekonic Studio Delux (which had that kind of sliderule dial) and study it.

Kari_Douma
09-03-2008, 06:39 PM
Thanks for the tips. I think I will decide after I look at the book "Photography" and start studying it. Then I will have a better idea if I will be ready. I know things like the exposre and EV values, but not dark room chemicals. (Ask me a photohop question, and I would do better than the darkroom!) I just emailed the Michigan President to see if we were going to have the CPP exam at the annual convention in Feb.

How soon in Advance do I have to reserve my spot if I decide I want to take it in Jan at Imaging?

Kari_Douma
09-03-2008, 06:43 PM
On the old cameras, we always had the full ranges of apertures and shutter speeds staring us in the face. Two clicks of one in one direction of exposure adjustment equalled two clicks of the other in the opposite direction of exposure adjustement.


I do use that to some extent. Two "clicks" on the thumb dial (Aperture) and two "clicks" on the finger dial (Shutter speed)! Can you still call them clicks?