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Results tagged “professional photographers” from PPA Today

Welcome to the end of your week! Hooray! You did it! Since you were probably out running around, being extremely productive and profitable, we wanted to round up our favorite photography-related posts from around the internet for you! 

COMPETITION: Photo Throwdown is an online series that pitches two pros against each other with photo challenges. It's education, entertaining and you get to see some of the industry's best in some weird situations. Check out this week's episode with Jen Rozenbaum versus Chris Fain (and cast your vote for who you think did the best job)!

INSPIRATION: If you love nature photography, you will enjoy the top 10 photographs from the Zoological Society of London's annual competition. The winning images will be on display in a special exhibit in the London Zoo! It might even inspire you to go explore this weekend and see what you can find!

BAD BUSINESS: File this one under "bad business practices" - see how this California Attorney made it seem like she was hob-knobbing with the likes of Morgan Freeman, Donald Trump, Ellen DeGeneres and so many more with the help of Photoshop! There hasn't been any news of copyright infringement on this case yet, but we wouldn't be surprised if that was coming down the line. Lesson learned: Photoshop can be used for both good & evil.

JUST FOR FUN: American photographer Sandro Miller partnered with John Malkovich to recreate some of the most famous portraits captured throughout history. The project is aptly titled, "Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to photographic masters." Check out some of the highlights here. 

COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT: Get a first-hand take on how copyright infringement impacts photographers on a day to day basis. Alex Wild walks you through the battle between copyright and the internet and why the thinks the internet won. (Don't let this article get you down - review your copyright resources here!)

SAY WHAT?: The US Forest Service wants you to pay to play when taking photographs or videos on their 36 million acres - up to $1,000 (no, that's not a typo). Read up on both sides of the story here, and we'll keep you updated on what comes of this. 

PRO TIP: The folks over at PhotoFocus have some hot tips on using Lightroom collections to organize your photos. Organization? Streamlining your workflow? You can't miss it. 

SAVVY GEAR SHOPPING: Leave it to the folks at Photography Concentrate and their top 10 ways to save big on photography gear. We'd like to add an eleventh tip: Join us at the Imaging USA Expo[LINK]. There are deals on deals for new gear and you get to try before you buy. 

TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE: Many photographers get their start in nature or landscape photography, in many cases because it's easy to experiment and the subject doesn't talk back about how their hair looks. Here are 21 tips to get experimental with your flower power photography!

GEAR HEADS: Strobist is here to save the day with some things to consider when investing in a new tripod. This piece of equipment holds your most valuable pieces of equipment, so it should go without saying that you shouldn't skimp on the funding. See what else they have to say here. 

There it is! Your top 10 photography blog posts from around the web this week. What photography blogs have you been enjoying? Let us know on theLoop!




If you weren't watching R Street's Hangout about copyright reform last week, you were missing a seriously concerning conversation.

The question of the day was "Has copyright gone too far?" 

R Street invited Tom W. Bell, author of the book Intellectual Privilege, Derek Khanna of R Street, Mitch Stoltz of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Ryan Radia of the Competitive Enterprise Institute to express their opinions. The discussion began with each of the panelists introducing their take on modern copyright law, and what he thought should be done about them. 

While each panelist agreed that modern copyright law needed to be worked on, they disagreed on what needed to be fixed - Bell argued for "the founders' idea of copyright," in reference to the Copyright Act of 1790 and soon the discussion turned to upholding outdated laws and applying them to modern society. Those in the online audience who asked questions about how this was working against the little guy - i.e., freelance writers, e-book authors, small creative business owners - were largely ignored, and their plight in fighting infringement was only briefly acknowledged. Some of the panelists even suggested that they shouldn't have property-like protections for their work because it would stifle others' creativity.

Um, excuse me?

But the talk ended on a note that everyone could agree on: "We can do better than what we have," Bell said.

Yes, indeed! But it's up to us to initiate this change. And when we say 'us', we mean all of us image creators, photographers, artists at large! As you know, PPA is representing photographers on Capitol Hill, month after month, advocating for small business copyright owners. You should join the movement for copyright reform so that things CAN move forward sooner than later. How? Simply letting your opinion known to your local representative (this hyperlink will help you identify who's yours!) You may think that your impact is a small water droplet, but if we ALL take a moment to tell them why it's important to protect our works, we'll be that much more. If you don't quite know what to say, you can check back to the blog for a template letter you can use. After all, what is an ocean but a multitude of drops? In the mean time, here are some easy ways to help you contact Congress!


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Here are the 10 photography blogs from May 24 - May 30, 2014 that we hope will inspire you and professional photographers around the web to be more!

Wal-Mart is still making waves on their case against the photographer's widow! Get the Washington Post's take on the situation here. 

Not cool, Jesse Chen, not cool. This software engineer at Facebook posted a tutorial on how to remove those pesky little watermarks from professional photos. The posts have since been taken down, but this read from Fstoppers is worth a look. 

If you find yourself near an active lava flow during your summer adventures, you'll be happy you have these great tips from PetaPixel under your belt! (Plus the example images are pretty awesome.)

How can you spot a newbie? PhotographyTalk has their nine sins of a noob - the last one is our favorite (and even the most seasoned of pros can slip up). 

How to Capture Creative Cold When You're at the End of Your Rope - Literally.
National Geographic photojournalist Jimmy Chin sits down with Chase Jarvis to talk all things photography. Not only is his story inspiring, but the images are fantastic and make you want to hit the road for the nearest mountain to climb or rock to repel. 

To go along with the post about Jimmy Chin, we thought it might be helpful to see how to take a photo from a kayak on your next adventure - and what do you know? Photo Naturalist just happened to write a little blog about it! 

If you're looking to expand your editing repertoire, this is a great article from PDN! We all know and love Photoshop, but what other software can make your images pop? Here are their top 10!

Tis the season for senior portraits! If you're in the market, here are some great ideas, tips and inspiration from Seniors Ignite on how to make the male clients get comfortable in front of the camera. 

New to the world of photographing interior architecture? If you're wanting to expand your product line, the School of Digital Photography has some great need-to-know info that will get you started on the right foot. 

Meteor showers are something else - and capturing them just right can be difficult. Outdoor Photo Gear has their top 10 tips for capturing the perfect image! (When is the next shower in your area? Check them out here!)

There you have it, the favorite blog posts of the week from your PPA team! Don't forget that you can share your own posts, or other stories you have enjoyed, on theLoop

Entering into the International Photographic Competition (IPC) can be intimidating, even if you know the 12 elements of a merit image like the back of your hand. It's easy to speculate what the judges are looking for in an image before they consider granting it a merit, so down below you'll find resources to clarify all this. You'll also find some tips on things to really avoid. 

There's a PPAedu series with IPC judge, Michael Timmons, M.Photog.M.Artist.Cr., CPP, F-ASP about all things relating to photo competition! Who better to tell you what the judges are looking for than... an actual judge? 

There's also a 3 easy-to-digest, 20-minute videos that break down the 12 elements. Watch them one at a time or back to back--however you learn best! They are must-watch for those who are newer to photographic competition, and an excellent refresher for those already preparing their entries this year. And because it's all on PPAedu, you can watch them as many times as you'd like. It's just one of the many benefits of your PPA membership

In the first part, Michael walks you through 4 of the 12 elements: Impact, Creativity, Style and Composition

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And to round things out, the 3rd piece focuses the last 4 elements: Color Balance, Technical Excellence, Technique and Storytelling

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Now you're well on your way to submitting a merit-worthy image at this year's International Photographic Competition! Entries are open May 26 - June 26 (or July 10 with a late fee). If you want to get the full experience, be sure to order a critique of your image. A judge like Michael will record a video showing you what you did well and what cause the image to fall short for a merit. It's a very effective way to find out what to work on and there's no better way to improve your craft!

These three videos and over 250 more are available to PPA members and PPAedu subscribers! Not a PPA member? Join now or subscribe to PPAedu to get full access to all the PPAedu on-demand videos.

Here are the 10 photography blogs from March 30 - April 4, 2014, that we hope will inspire you and professional photographers around the internet to be more!

Since April Fool's Day was earlier this week, and hopefully full of tom foolery - here's one of our favorite cartoons, What the Duck to give you a giggle

First things first, don't try this at home. Check out how Katerina Plotnikova used some furry (and some not so furry) friends to make beautiful, dream-like portraits. 

Sometimes your skills need a bit of a workout to make sure they are where they need to be. Digital Photography School has your top three moves to sharpen your skills and up your game. 

Tax Day is right around the corner and the folks at PhotoShelter want to help you keep every penny you can! Check out their top 10 common tax deductions that could save you a bundle! 

That's right--it's a whole month dedicated to educating the greater photography industry on copyrights! What do they mean to you, your clients and your vendors! See you how you can get involved here. 

This is amazing! Instead of just guessing if it's going to rain (or snow), there's a website that predicts cloud cover! This is perfect for landscape, night, or nature photographers, as much as for outdoor portrait image makers! 

Andy Smith took the helm of Rick Sammon's Photography blog and talks about all of the beautiful ways you can capture a sunburst effect. Not only is it great information, but has some beautiful examples! 

The CANIKON is here! Well--not exactly. Get the quick and dirty on why this new M15P-CL is making an impact on the market from PetaPixel. 

The man behind the images of Jane Goodall sits down to talk to National Geographic about his experiences behind the camera, interacting with the scientist and the natural habitat around them. 

If you want to get into the world of making videos from your images, but don't know how--PhotographyTalk has a wonderful first step in using your photo booth images! Get the details on how to expand your offerings here.

There you have it, the favorite blog posts of the week from your PPA team! Don't forget that you can share your own posts, or other stories you have enjoyed, on theLoop.
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This year is flying by - so quickly that Daylight Savings Time is already coming up this weekend. Remember to 'spring ahead' on Sunday! So what are some top posts you may have missed this week? We have the 10 photography blogs from March 2 - 7, 2014, that we hope will inspire you to be more!

Imaging USA speaker, Rachel Stephens talks feel-good inspiration with CreativeLIVE. Go forth and conquer your fears (and your weekend) after reading this one.

Nature photographers often get an unfair rep. PhotographyTalk would like to put an end to it. Here are the 5 myths about pro nature photographers. 

How about a little flash back Friday? Here are 40 photographs that will make you appreciate today just a little bit more and will put the value of your work as a photographer in perspective. Documenting history is one of the reasons why photography will never go away!

Long exposure photography has started to gain popularity over the last few years - here are Digital Photography School's top 8 tips to consider before venturing out to try this approach. 
 
Ryan Williams and SLR Lounge got together to talk specifics when doing portraits in the beautiful golden hour. Talk shop, settings and post processing to get this magical, natural look.

We've all been there--you're contacted by a bride-to-be and all goes swimmingly. You're on the road to a great working relationship when (out of nowhere) she stops returning your calls. SLR Lounge has the four things you can do to fix the situation.  

Thanks to Ellen (and her famous friends), the Oscar selfie seen round the world raises some interesting copyright questions. Who has the copyright on the most shared photo on Twitter? 

This crowd-sourced movie is coming to a theater near you (schedule to be released at the end of the month!) Check out the trailer of this private photographer's work--or if you live in Portland, check it out now!

Getty Images announced they are dropping their watermark from the bulk of its collection this week--and to many WordPress bloggers with no budget, it's looking like a free stock imagery field day! Get the full story from the team over at the Verge here. 

Want to better you black and white photographs? Skip the grayscale button and go for the Zone System! Get a review of it here from Photofocus.

There you have it, our favorite blog posts of the week! Don't forget that you can share your own blog posts, or others that you have enjoyed, on theLoop
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Happy Valentine's Day!  Here at PPA, we love (Get it? Valentine's Day? Love?) helping you be more as a professional photographer. With that in mind, here are 10 photography blogs from this week, that we think will help make you fall a little bit more in love with the industry.

For the do-it-yourselfers, pyro and light painting fans out there - this is a great how-to for steel wool photography (along with some pretty nifty examples).  Just remember, PPA doesn't condone lighting yourself or your neighborhood on fire.  

Afraid of heights? You might want to skip this one. Two Russian climbers summited the second tallest building in the world (Shanghai Tower) without safety equipment or ropes and caught it all on film. (Please don't try this at home!)

Jim Richardson, accomplished National Geographic photographer, gives you the basics on panning motion photography. Take these simple tricks to the next level.

Ok, we don't love this at all. Facebook made a video saying "Remembering the big day is easier with friends" (you can check the video out on the link). But one creative photographer did come up with a beautiful parody video. 

The article above brought us back to thinking about an infographic from Buzzfeed. If you missed it earlier this week, it's worth the chuckles. (If you have some of your own, post them on our Facebook page!)

Adventure photographer Lucas Gilman talks social shop with the team at Photoshelter. See how 14,000 Instagram followers (and 9,000 on Twitter) has helped his career, creativity and business strategy. 

SLR Lounge has the tip of tips to help you drastically improve your black and white images from bland and boring to (dare we say) majestic. Get the details here, you're sure to find a couple of nuggets for your own business. 

Sochi has caused quite the hubbub leading up to the Winter Olympics- so what's it like now that the competitions are underway? Sports photographer Robert Hanashiro checks in with an up close and personal look at the games. 


Max Jackson, a Florida Atlantic University student, allowed the Color Run to use one of his images on their Facebook page. When he found that image in their print and marketing materials, he asked for some compensation. What happens next will blow your mind. Read on! 

We're not kidding. Make sure to clear the room of children, or adults with sensitive ears because you might be spewing four letter words (and we don't mean l-o-v-e) after reading this post from PetaPixel. Oh! and the comments will be worth your while too!

There you have it, our favorite blog posts of the week! Don't forget that you can share your own blog posts, or others that you have enjoyed, on theLoop

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Written by guest blogger, Christine Walsh-Newton

When I began my journey to being a professional photographer, I was determined to do it right. I wanted to find ways to measure my capability and skills. Ways that would keep me in check and provide me the opportunity to continually learn and improve. 


Through my membership, I may enter the district and international print competitions sponsored by PPA. Through my state affiliate (Professional Photographers of Ohio), I also participate on a local level. 

Each spring, I compete at my state. There, I am allowed to enter six of my best images. Then I choose the four best from that group and send them on to the Northeast District competition. Depending on the results of that competition, I may forward all four images to the international competition in the summer, or I may elect to do some more work on them first. I may even decide to replace them with a different images.

One of the delightful benefits to competition is that you can order critiques of your images recorded by the affiliated judges that were at the competition. I always purchase the critiques and generally follow the advice of the juror who recorded it. I feel fortunate that PPA offers this service. What a wonderful way to get input on our images!

What competition means to me:
Each year that I've participated in print competition, I've learned and I've grown. Sometimes I get decent scores or an award, but the important part to me is that I improve. I listen quietly during the judging and take notes. Even if the judges speak about an image that isn't mine, the knowledge they impart is applicable to my work. Through judging I'm learning the intricacies of lighting, presentation and composition. I learn what color combinations work and which ones are best left alone. I learn the subtleties of posing and body language.

I've learned all these things in a general manner through my own education and study and have refined them through use, but listening to judge after judge make a quiet comment here or point out a flaw there has trained me to look hard at the details. Little by little my work has improved. The subtle differences and changes I have made have started to add up and my work has shown tremendous strides in technical competence in just a few short years of competing.

Scoring is important to me and the fact that PPA has a standard scoring system that is consistently maintained gives print competition the credibility that I need in order to trust that it is a valid evaluation of my work. The judges are thoroughly trained and vetted and must also use the scoring system in a manner that provides consistency. My scores show me where I'm at in relation to standard expectations for photographic quality. In the beginning it took awhile for my work to reach the "deserving of a merit" range of scores, and with hard and consistent work, I've been given the pleasure of watching those scores rise over time.

A benefit of competing that was surprising is the inspiration I've gained from viewing images from other competitors. Over the last few years I've probably watched several thousand images go through judging. The amount of talent exhibited is enormous and overwhelming at times. Other competitors have been generous with their time and advice, assisting me along my journey. Sometimes I think "competition" isn't quite the correct term as my fellow competitors and I seem to have bonded into a beneficial family of sorts. It's rare for there to be competition between competitors that I know and some of my best competitor friends and I share ideas, techniques and images with each other while preparing for competition. Sometimes we find ourselves cheering and commiserating with each other, depending on our results. 

How it helps me grow: 
At my first competition, I volunteered in the print room. After a few hours of unpacking print cases and viewing a large number of exquisite images, I was afraid for my own. I tried to figure out how to "unenter" and hide my print case in my car. I was unsure of my skills and my talent. I was scared. And I was embarrassed to show my work. I was not confident and those first few rounds of critiques were difficult to digest.

Progressively, through competition, critiques, judgings and just plain old networking with other competitors, I am now more sure of what I'm doing and have a higher level of faith in my work. Competition has given me the confidence to recognize when I'm creating nice work. And the humility to realize it when I'm not and ask for help. And when I receive that help, I can now view it objectively and embrace it as part of my learning and growing process. 

Once upon a time I only dreamed of doing well in competition and of learning from photographers who were leading the way. For awhile I thought it was a goal well out of my grasp. Through competition, I've learned to set goals and work towards them progressively so that over time I'd get there. The journey will never be complete, but with the help of PPA competition, it has been a progressive and positive one.

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Written by guest blogger and Imaging USA first-timer, Danielle Brooks.

Every August when kids go back to school I get jealous. 

I used to love getting new pens, binders, notepads and best of all, having new classes. I loved school. Every year in college, when a new course catalog would come out, I would spend the afternoon reading the course selections. I got so excited looking forward to what I could study the next semester. It's okay, I can admit I'm a total nerd. 

However, the same is true of Imaging USA. As soon as I signed up to go, I immediately got excited about the dozens of classes being offered. And who wouldn't be excited about this opportunity to learn? There are so many great teachers and classes that it is seriously difficult to choose from them all. How do you pick? And more importantly, if this is your first time to IUSA, where do you start? 

I first started planning my classes based on seniors. They are the number one market I want to break into, and I want to be able to market myself to them effectively. However, after the initial "course catalog high" wore off I really started to question if those courses would be the most beneficial to me at this stage in my business. 

When you are first starting out at IUSA it is probably best to analyze your skill set and plan your courses accordingly. For me, IUSA is about kicking my business into high gear. No more playing games and wasting time. I want to focus on my skills and make my photos the best they can be. 

I sat down and took a hard look at my photos and determined that I need to focus on lighting and posing. I need to learn how to really SEE light. I need to focus on how to look for it, how to use it, and how to control it. Posing clients can always be a struggle. I have ideas, but how do I effectively communicate them to my clients? How can I constantly create new poses without my work looking the same? How can I make my clients look less awkward? All of these questions need to be answered before I can really take my business to the next level. 

Learning how to market to seniors won't help me when it comes to posing or lighting. I can have the best marketing plan in the world, but if my clients' pictures are subpar, no amount of advertising will help. 

As a newbie to IUSA it is my initial defense mechanism to puff myself up and pretend to be a better photographer than I really am. When I was coming to terms with my skills, I would tell myself, "I don't need help with lighting and posing, that stuff is for beginners." 

But the reality is: I am a beginner. That was a hard pill to swallow. 

We all have to start somewhere, and after a tough conversation (with myself) about my wants versus my needs, the answer was crystal clear. I'll probably take a few classes aimed at marketing to seniors, but the majority of my time will be spent in posing and lighting. 

I don't want to roll in to IUSA prideful, giving off the impression I don't need help. It might make me feel good in the short term, but it's just a mask for my insecurities and it wouldn't be beneficial to me in the long run. The reality is that the people I look up to in the field were in my shoes at some point in their career. So I will be as humble as possible; accepting help any way it comes. Even if I am the worst photographer at IUSA, I know that I wont leave with the same skill set I came in with. After all, when you are surrounded by greatness the only place left to go is up.

So sit down and really analyze your work. What are your wants versus your needs? My advice would be the 75/25 principle. Take 75% of the classes you know you need, and take 25% of the classes that you want to just for fun! IUSA is more than just learning. Yes, improve your skills, make the most of your time there, but don't overlook opportunities to have fun! Take the chance to meet new people and get some sweet swag! You chose photography as a career for a reason. Reconnect with your passion and remember why you fell in love with your camera in the first place. 

And if you're a veteran of IUSA you should look into the Alumni Program. They will sign you up with a newbie such as myself. It gives us first timers a chance to ask any questions we may have for a more seasoned individual. You would also be able to help us navigate the tradeshow floor and make sure we know where to spot good deals. What better way is there to spend a couple of hours at IUSA than imparting your knowledge and wisdom to the next generation? 

We need and want your expertise. We are hungry for it. After all a wise man once said, "Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it." 

Not to say that we are children, but you get the picture. 



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