PPA Today: Search Results

Results tagged “Photography association” from PPA Today

roundup weekly blog.jpg
by Trent Schick

With Memorial Day just around the corner, we hope you enjoy your long weekend. While you're relaxing, take some time to check out our favorite photography blog posts from this week!

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY: Talk about perfect timing! Take a look at these amazing sports photos taken at just the right moment in everything from baseball, judo, and Formula 1 racing. Find out what's going on in these crazy pictures from CNN!

DRONES: With the popularity "soaring" for drones, a whole new platform for photography has opened up. Telegraph is promoting this new book, Dronescapes, which features incredible pictures from all over the world taken by drones. You can see a few samples of just how amazing these photos are.


ANIMALS: Get ready to bust out laughing at these animals caught in the act of some hilarious scenes. These critters are hysterical, goofy, and down-right adorable. Flow Art Station has captured some great pictures that are sure to brighten your day.


Q&A: Gain some great insight and advice from a Lensculture interview with Sarah Leen, the Director of Photography for National Geographic. Learn about the advantages of school vs. experience, how to improve as a photographer, and even insider info on National Geographic. 


PHOTOGRAPHY: Take a look into the past, of the historical city in England called Leeds. These pictures offer an incredibly vintage and retro feel, by illustrating the style and culture from the time period. See how much our society has changed by checking these photos out on Fubiz.


MARKETING: It's very common for people to struggle with attracting the amount of clients they want, because their marketing strategies and ideas are weak. If you're still wondering why you're not getting the clients you want, you should check out this article by Fstoppers. They show you the marketing mistakes many photographers make, how to fix them, and where you should be putting your focus to be more successful.


REVIEW: You might laugh or even gag at the thought of ever using a disposable camera, but don't be too quick to refuse. In this article by The Phoblographer, six disposable cameras were tested and reviewed to see how they rank up. They provide unedited images and the results are very surprising, especially when you see the price. Try for yourself and even make a fun project out of it, you could be surprised.


MATERNITY: With Memorial Day weekend just around the corner, check out this article Peta Pixel posted on a very heartwarming maternity photo. A husband fighting for his country overseas and a pregnant wife in the states never had a chance to take their maternity pictures together. See how this photographer made that happen with this beautiful picture she created.


PRICING: Pricing can be one of the most frustrating things for a photographer. You must consider many factors to land on a price that benefits you and satisfies the customer. Learn from this article at Seniors Ignite how you should correctly price your products and services, and the importance of emphasizing value and how to use it. 


PHOTOVISION: If you haven't heard of PhotoVision, it is an excellent tool for you to access over 500 tutorial videos designed to improve your skills as a photographer. The best part is, if you're a PPA member, PhotoVision is included FREE. Check out some of the latest uploads on PPA Today that include videos which cover in-person selling, marketing to women, sales techniques, and more!


There you have 'em, our weekly blog post roundup! What photography blogs or podcasts do YOU follow? Post your favorites on theLoop or email them to us at OnlineContentCommittee@PPA.com.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG



PPAedu_Free-Webinar_05-25-17_1200x1200.jpg
by Trent Schick

If fine art photography is something you have a passion for or are interested in doing, then this webinar is for you!

Join the acclaimed photographer/artist Thomas Dodd as he delves into all the important business facets of being successful in fine art photography. He will talk about the significance of influences and intentions, how to market yourself online and off, how to find, approach, and work with galleries, and much more you can learn about through his one hour presentation.

This webinar is FREE and open to both PPA members and non-members alike, so register now and tune in tomorrow, May 25, 2017, at 2:00 pm ET!

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

By Bethany Clark

Calling all drone photographers! Have you heard of the General Liability Endorsement, exclusively made for UAS/Drone operators? This type of coverage will help you be more protected while operating your drone on assignment!

PPA's General Liability Insurance has coverage of $1 million per occurrence, or up to $2 million total. If you want to cover your drone under the same terms, it is recommended for you to purchase Drone endorsement insurance as well. Please note that this coverage is sold separately from the PhotoCare Equipment Insurance that is provided with your PPA membership. 

Drone Liability Coverage terms and conditions: 

  • You must be a member of PPA
  • Coverage must be purchased in conjunction with PPA's General Liability coverage
  • Limit options of $50,000 and $25,000 
  • Annual premiums of $150 and $100
  • Must be compliant with Part 107 Federal Aviation Regulations, and also state and local regulations
  • Operation of drone must be in connection with a paid assignment for your business
  • Defense coverage is included inside the limit of liability
  • Coverage extends to bodily injury and property damage of others

Ready to purchase coverage? Call our team at 888-202-1526 to secure your coverage today!

Not sure what the new FAA drones rules are? Visit PPA.com/Drones!


may17botmblogfooter.JPG
by Trent Schick

As of May 22, photographers can now enter their work in PPA's International Photographic Competition (IPC). We hear from past entrants that entering images in the IPC is one of the best ways to improve as a photographer. During the IPC, jurors give competitors the opportunity to receive advice that will improve their future output and could land their work in PPA's Loan Collection, and be honored at Imaging USA 2018 in Nashville! 

If you choose to have your images critiqued, you'll get a recording of a judge going through each image you've entered in the photo competition, explaining how it stacks up against the 12 elements of a winning image, and what you could have done to take your image to the next level if you fell a little short! So, don't be shy! Enter your images to be critiqued by official jurors at this year's competition. Recorded critiques are a fantastic way to learn, specifically, how you can take your images to the next level.

To give you an idea of the types of things you can learn from a critique at IPC, check out this one from last year's competition. This is "Balancing Act" by Angela Cuhel, critiqued by Dennis Hammon, M. Photog.Cr., CPP, F-ASP.


Thinking about entering your images and ordering a critique? Take the plunge! You'll get the opportunity to: 

  • Understand what the judges expect from competitors 
  • Get an idea about the current state of your photography 
  • Improve your work with advice straight from jurors to help you
Having a judge take time to give personal advice on how to improve a specific image is just what you need to grow not only as a photographer but artist! 

Important info:

  • Judging for the IPC will be held July 30-August 2, 2017 at Gwinnett Tech in Lawrenceville GA, right outside Atlanta. It's open to the public and it's free to attend, but if you can't make it in person, you have no excuse not to watch the online streaming of the entire judging process! It's one of the best ways to learn what judges are looking for in this image competition.
  • Early registration to enter your images opens May 22, 2017-June 21, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Entries after June 21 at 5 pm ET will be accepted with a late fee through July 6. Please note that no entries will be accepted after July 6, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Watch live streaming of IPC judging at Stream.TheIPC.org: July 30, 4 pm - 7 pm ET, July 31 and August 1, 8:30 am - 6 pm ET, and August 2, 8:30 am ET to finish.

This year's competition has some new rules, so click here to view the IPC Photographic Open rules and the IPC Artist Competition rules, or check them at PPA.com/IPC. 

And don't forget to enter your images early to beat the crowd and save some money!

may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Sidra Safri

Many photographers have complained about the archaic registration system of the Copyright Office, how long the process takes and, overall, how cumbersome it is. Thankfully, these complaints have not fallen on deaf ears. 

In 2013, the Copyright Office began looking into potential updates to the overall IT system that impacts the registration process. This research lead to the creation of a report stating it was necessary to create a better user-interface and more accurate public record.

On May 9th, 2017, the Copyright Office rolled out a pilot program for Bulk Submission of Claims to Copyright. This pilot program will serve a very small niche of creators, since it will only be available for literary works (such as fiction, nonfiction, autobiographies, etc.). Single literary works that have single authors, with all the work being owned and created by that single author, are eligible for the bulk registration program.

Even though this program is not available to photographers, the Copyright Office is taking a step in the right direction to make the process easier and faster. Through this pilot process they will be able to work out any issues that arise, and eventually (we hope) roll out the bulk submission process for all categories.

PPA will keep you updated as developments unfold, so stay tuned to PPA.com/Advocacy for the latest. 

Want to get in on the ground floor of copyright reform? Sign up today and be a part of the PPA Grassroots Action Team at PPA.com/grassroots!

may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Chris Homer

Back in the days of film, infrared photography was a complicated undertaking that was rarely used outside of scientific and fine art applications. Today, photographers looking to offer something unusual to clients might find this alternative process an appealing option.

Laurie Klein is one photographer who's demonstrated the power of differentiation through infrared. "I've made most of the money in my career with infrared photography," she notes. And she says others can do the same.



ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

By Chris Homer

If you are a photographer, PhotoVision is a great way to elevate your skills by using the more than 500 video tutorials from some of the top photographers in the business. Better yet, PhotoVision is included for FREE with your PPA membership! Head on over to PhotoVisionVideo.com to begin streaming classes.

And if it's been a minute since you've checked in with PhotoVision, be sure to come back and watch these new videos! The new releases include Sue Bryce and Anne Geddes, who are contributing to the PhotoVision's  new 'Year of Inspiration' series.

Sue Bryce

Consider the fact that marketing to women is different than marketing to men and you'll see why Sue Bryce views this as an ideal opportunity to focus your message. As a glamour photographer, the majority of her clients are women and she shares how she tailors her messaging to suit them. Sue systematically breaks down the different demographics while explaining the types of products each is drawn to.

Anne Geddes

One of the most fascinating elements of an artist is learning how their mind creates and works before they ever pick up the camera. In this video, world-renowned photographer and story-teller, Anne Geddes, shares her creative process and gives a glimpse into her own inspiration. In addition to her aesthetic, Anne speaks about the journeys she's faced throughout her career and the lifetime of stories she has amassed along the way. She discusses how much research and hard work went into each of the six books she has created, while also giving an inside look of her newest work available since April 2017, Small World.

Andy Marcus

Andy Marcus photographs a wedding couple in the lofted garden of a Manhattan skyscraper. He then goes inside to photograph them in silhouette against the NYC skyline. Andy discusses the importance of assistants and how to best utilize them in an effective manner.

Sue Bryce

To be a successful photographer, you must have a firm understanding of sales, pricing, and the products of your business. In this video, Sue Bryce shares her own philosophies and the tried-and-true sales techniques she has learned over the years, including her two favorite products to sell to her clients. Additionally, Sue explains the psychology behind the placement of your middle package to achieve your desired average sale while still keeping your price list simple and clean to improve your overall sales.

Andy Marcus

Andy Marcus photographs a wedding couple in a beautiful European-style memorial garden and then takes them to the waterfront to capture their images against the Jersey skyline. Andy and his assistants demonstrate how to utilize silhouettes and leading lines to create stunning abstract images that will sell. Learn how he uses blurred foreground to create frames within a frame that help give images an artistic flair.

Sue Bryce

As a photographer and business owner, in-person sales can be directly correlated to an increase in your profits. In this video, Sue Bryce explains how the PRINT Movement has restored the value of printed images and empowered photographers to present their art in the way it was intended: in print. Additionally, Sue shares the satisfaction derived from seeing her clients view their images for the first time as a piece of artwork that will last a lifetime.

Visit PhotoVisionVideo.com today to access all of these classes! If you're not a PPA member, join today and you'll be able to watch all the PhotoVision and PPAedu photography tutorials. Together, that's more than 1,000 videos designed to help you take your photography to the next level! You have nothing to lose, try it today!


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

By Bethany Clark

IPC_1200x1200_2.jpg
Today is May 22, 2017, and it's the first day to enter your best images into the International Photographic Competition

The judging for PPA's annual International Photographic Competition (IPC) takes place July 30-August 2, 2017 and now it's time to submit the best images in your portfolio. IPC is an excellent opportunity to challenge yourself, so you definitely don't want to miss it! 

By competing in the IPC, you'll get the chance to elevate your work through: 

  • Getting critiques from PPA certified jurors 
  • Competing against the best in the business
  • Engaging with the photographic community 
  • Watching the judging live stream and learn from real images and real judges, in real time!

Here's a quote from PPA member Kira Derryberry, M.Photog.Cr., CPP about her IPC experience with entering her images in the IPC: 

"I was awarded my Master of Photography degree with Professional Photographers of America! Print competition is hands down one of the largest contributing factors to my growth as a photographer and artist. After competing diligently for the last 3 years, I'm proud to call myself a Master! Check that one off the list!" 

This is a great opportunity to improve your work. It's time you start entering your images! 

Important info:

  • Judging for the IPC will be held July 30-August 2, 2017 at Gwinnett Tech in Lawrenceville GA, right outside Atlanta. It's open to the public and it's free to attend, but if you can't make it in person, you have no excuse not to watch the online streaming of the entire judging process! It's one of the best ways to learn what judges are looking for in this image competition.
  • Early registration to enter your images opens May 22, 2017-June 21, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Entries after June 21 at 5 pm ET will be accepted with a late fee through July 6. Please note that no entries will be accepted after July 6, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Watch live streaming of IPC judging at Stream.TheIPC.org: July 30, 4 pm - 7 pm ET, July 31 and August 1, 8:30 am - 6 pm ET, and August 2, 8:30 am ET to finish.

This year's competition has some new rules, so click here to view the IPC Photographic Open rules and the IPC Artist Competition rules, or check them at PPA.com/IPC. 

And don't forget to enter your images early to beat the crowd and save some money!

may17botmblogfooter.JPG
Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for roundup weekly blog.jpg
by Trent Schick

It has been a long week, and the weekend is finally here! You deserve a break and relaxation, so while you do, take some time to enjoy our favorite photography blog posts of the week!

COPYRIGHT: Still think your photos aren't valuable enough to register for copyright? The copyright owner for photographs of plants (!) is sure glad they did. See how this person hit the mother lode and you might change your mind.

TIME-LAPSE VIDEOS: Time-lapse videos are a great way to literally make the time go by faster. Learn how to create them in a more efficient and creative way with this post from Tech Republic. Add flare to your work with a walk-through process on how to form one by reading this article.

PROTECTION: As a PPA member, you can be assured that you always have a virtual suit-of-armor around you. Better known as the Shield of Protection, PPA is there no matter what goes wrong to help protect you, save you money, and help you Be More. Find out the three big ways PPA insurance keeps you best protected at the PPA Today Blog!

ENGAGEMENT MISHAP: I bet you have never had this happen to you. Mashable has this story about a photographer who takes engagement pictures of the WRONG couple. It may sound like a nightmare, but this tale has a surprisingly fortunate ending. Read here to find out just what happened.

GEAR: Camera gear can be a pain having to take and carry around; especially if you're doing it wrong. Well don't worry, because you can learn to be stylish and secure as the fun and charismatic Christopher Niccolls demonstrates all the do's and don'ts of how to carry your photography gear in this article.

LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY: Need some places to add to your photography bucket list? These truly breathtaking landscapes will make you want to book a flight today. Check out this article from FStoppers to see just where you can find them.

CREATIVITY: You will regret pushing off all those times you said you would go to the gym after reading this article. With it getting more competitive every day to make a name for yourself, it is important to always try and get a leg up on the competition. Learn how you can boost your creative edge through exercising and being more active... yes this even applies to photographers!

HOW TO: Sunset photography is something everyone can do, because you can do it virtually anywhere you are. As well, they are a great way to help build your confidence and skill as a photographer through experimentation. Learn how to master sunsets in an in-depth, step-by-step process through this article.

MONEY: Ever wondered if photographers can really make any money? Ever seen a Senior Portrait Photographer driving a Porsche? Find out the answer to both these questions through this article on SeniorsIgnite.com, it might surprise you!

LOCATION: Peta Pixel has some absolutely astonishing photos of a couple who had their wedding photos taken on Mt. Everest! No amount of altitude or bitter cold could stop this marriage. Check out these stunning photos that redefine couple goals.

There you have 'em, our weekly blog post roundup! What photography blogs or podcasts do YOU follow? Post your favorites on theLoop or email them to us at OnlineContentCommittee@PPA.com.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG



By James Yates
iStock_000018508366Large.jpg

PPA members know they have a virtual suit-of-armor surrounding them. It's the PPA Shield of protection, and it has you covered on all sides: gear, liability, negligence and data loss recovery ...no matter what goes wrong. These are the three big ways PPA's forms of photographic insurance keep you fully protected, save you money, and help you Be More. 

Coverage- if you break your camera or it's stolen from your car, then no worries! If you've activated PhotoCare, you're covered! 
  • Did you know you can get up to $15,000 of photo equipment insurance for FREE when you join PPA? PhotoCare Equipment Insurance is included with the PPA Professional Active membership. All you have to do is activate your policy. PPA pays the premium for up to $15,000 just in case  you lose your photo gear, computer, tablet, or printer to fire, theft, or breakage.. And, you get worldwide coverage while on location. With a first loss deductible of only $250 (excluding breakage), it can pay big to opt-in to PPA's PhotoCare Equipment Insurance. 
  • PhotoCare Plus is also available for members to purchase and covers up to $100,000 on the same damages as PhotoCare, in addition to coverage for mysterious disappearance and non-PPA member employee coverage. PhotoCare Plus will also insure your drone if it falls from the sky.

Assistance- If someone got hurt or something was destroyed on your shoot, General Liability Coverage will handle it.
  • At some point, we all fall victim to Murphy's Law- the idea that everything that can go wrong will go wrong. Did your lighting setup fall over on someone's aunt at the wedding? Did little Cousin Billy break his arm when he tripped over your extension cord? We hope you never have to use this benefit, but if you do, it can help save your reputation, business, and a LOT of money. Nearly all commercial and event shoots now require general liability insurance coverage. It's incredibly affordable to get the protection you need, and you can even get up to $2 million for less than 62ยข a day! 
  • Drone Photography Liability Insurance is also now available as an add-on to your existing policy. It covers bodily injury and property damage caused by an FAA-certified drone photographer while on a paid assignment. In the event of a chain reaction, your insurance will also cover the non-drone, additional damage.

Peace-of-Mind- Got an unsatisfied client, or lost all the data on your hard drive or SD card? PPA's Indemnification Trust is like malpractice protection for you. 
  • Have you ever faced angry clients whose images all just disappeared from your hard drive? PPA is here to help. PPA photographers get a type of malpractice coverage, called PPA's Indemnification Trust, which comes included in the membership and helps when things go wrong like data loss, equipment malfunction, mistakes, or unsatisfied clients. The Trust can step in and guide you through the claim process, pay for data recovery services if needed, negotiate and pay any settlement, prepare you for court if needed, appoint local counsel at the Trust's expense if necessary, and pay judgments for most types of damages awarded to your client if things end up in a court. In summary, the Trust covers and protects all Professional Active members at no cost after they clear their small deductible. 
The next time you're feeling vulnerable or overwhelmed by everything life can throw at a small business owner, lean on your PPA membership, because it truly has your back. Let PPA be your shield! All these benefits and more are available for you to save money and be more profitable. Find out how you and your photography business can Be More Protected at PPA.com/NoBrainer. 

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for James.JPG
James Yates is an Atlanta-based writer/actor and the Communications Specialist at Professional Photographers of America (PPA). A graduate of Georgia State University, James has worked in the non-profit sector his whole life and is proud to be able to help artists achieve their goals. In his spare time he can be found walking his dogs on the Beltline or partaking in the nightly theater and comedy scene in the ATL.




may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Sidra Safri

iStock-607606926.jpg
As a part of our drone waiver series, we will continue to talk about the 9 waivers drone photographers can apply for under the section 107 regulations. 

Today our focus will be Section 107.29 and being unable to fly at night. The FAA drone regulations state: "No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during the night." This means that, without a waiver, a drone operator can only fly during civil twilight (30 min before sunrise), during the day, and evening twilight (30 min after sunset).*+

Luckily, for many drone-photographers, the most commonly-requested and approved waiver is Night Operation. When applying for this waiver, be specific, but not too specific. You do not want to limit yourself too much. Do your research on the area and show the FAA that you are prepared to handle any possible situation. This includes, explaining how the operator will maintain a visual line of sight with the drone during the darkness, how you plan to avoid people, structures, and other aircraft, and how you will know - in darkness - the location, altitude, and movement of the drone. 

To submit your waivers, visit the FAA's website. After submitting your waiver to the FAA, make sure you pay attention to any correspondence from the FAA to avoid delays. See you next week for part 3! And if you missed part 1, go back and read about Section 107.25 - operation from a moving vehicle, boat, or aircraft.

*Must use anti-collision lights that are visible for 3 statutory miles when flying during either twilights. 
+Alaska: Twilight is determined by the Almanac. 

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

By Sidra Safri
IMG_2964.JPG

In the world of Intellectual Property (IP) there are three main categories:

1. Patents
2. Trademarks
3. Copyright

These three categories are distinct in their own ways and work to protect their creator, inventor, or the company that made them or who they represent. All three (patents, trademarks, and copyrights) can be used together, but people largely tend to confuse the differences between Copyright and Trademark. 

A trademark can be wording, phrasing, slogan symbols, graphics or designs that help identify a brand or set them apart from others. A logo is a great example of a trademark. Trademarks do not expire after a set number of years, therefore giving them the ability to last forever as long as they are being used. You are not required to register a trademark with the United State Patent Office, but are encouraged to do so for added protection and benefit.

A copyright protects original creations that include literary works, performing arts, photographs, etc. and can be registered with the Copyright Office in the Library of Congress. Copyright protection is determined based on different factors such as when the content was created, was it created using a pseudonym or anonymously, or it was a work-for-hire. These protections can last from 50 years after the creator's death to 120 years after publication. 

Similar to a trademark, a copyright does not need to be registered but is encouraged for added protection and higher statutory damages. 

For more information and a more detailed breakdown of these three main categories of IP, visit the USPTO website. 


may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Chris Homer

Have you checked out theLoop recently? theLoop is an exclusive photographer-only forum
TheLoop jpg 825x399.jpg
 where PPA members can connect, ask questions, and share their stories with other members. It's a great way to get the advice you've been looking for, or even offer up some advice of your own. 

Here are some of the top discussions on theLoop from May! Check them out, provide some feedback, and perhaps even learn something new.

One photographer has a question about sales tax. Take a look and see if you can help out... or just check that you're doing things correctly!

Do you need a photo release when photographing old buildings? Find out in this discussion.

When you sell a large, framed print, should you put a watermark anywhere on it? See how other photographers feel about it, and chime in!

What is your idea of perfect lighting, and what techniques do you use to create it? Share and learn in this discussion.

A photographer new to blogging is looking for advice on how often to post and how to grow an audience. If you have a blog, share your thoughts!

In this discussion, photographers chime in on the conundrum of whether to buy a new camera body, or just new lenses. See what they have to say and add your own advice.

And there you have 'em, the top posts from theLoop! Remember to check out theLoop frequently as new discussions are posted daily. It's a great way to catch up with fellow PPA members! Not a PPA member? Join today!


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

By Bethany Clark
 
IPC_1200x1200_5.jpg
Photographers, it's time to pull your best images and work on your competition entries for the International Photographic Competition

The IPC judging will take place this summer, and those who enter will once again get ahead of their peers, so get ready! 

The IPC is PPA's annual photographic competition that allows photographers to test their skills, and get advice on how to improve quality, impact and technique through constructive competition and critiques from qualified jurors. Participating in PPA's photographic competitions gives you the opportunity to:

  • Improve upon your finest work 
  • Earn recognition and admiration from your peers
  • Engage with the passionate and supportive photographic competition community
  • And improve your business!

If you're smarter than average, you'll also choose to have your images critiqued, and will receive a recording from a judge with feedback on each image you've entered in the competition, explaining to you how each photo stacks up against the 12 elements of a winning image, and what you could have done better if it fell a little short! So, don't be shy! Enter your images to be critiqued by official jurors at this year's competition. Recorded critiques are a fantastic way to learn, specifically, how you can take your images to the next level.

To give you an idea of the types of things you can learn from a critique at IPC, check out this one from last year's competition. This is "Forged in Steel" by Shellie Kappelman, critiqued by Cary Garrison:



Important info:

  • Judging for the IPC will be held July 30-August 2, 2017 at Gwinnett Tech in Lawrenceville GA, right outside Atlanta. It's open to the public and it's free to attend, but if you can't make it in person, you have no excuse not to watch the online streaming of the entire judging process! It's one of the best ways to learn what judges are looking for in this image competition.
  • Early registration to enter your images opens May 22, 2017-June 21, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Entries after June 21 at 5 pm ET will be accepted with a late fee through July 6. Please note that no entries will be accepted after July 6, 2017 by 5 pm ET
  • Watch live streaming of IPC judging at Stream.TheIPC.org: July 30, 4 pm - 7 pm ET, July 31 and August 1, 8:30 am - 6 pm ET, and August 2, 8:30 am ET to finish.

This year's IPC has some new rules. Be sure to check them out and enter your images early to beat the crowds and save some money!


may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Chris Homer

This year, PPA's District Photographic Competitions were a great success! Thank you to everyone who entered. As we look forward to kicking off the upcoming International Photographic Competition (IPC), let's check out some of the interesting stats from the District Photographic Competitions!

In the Southwest District, 971 images were entered - with 54% earning a merit. Meanwhile, in the Northeast District, of 1,000 entries, 45% earned a merit. In the Northcentral District, 709 images were entered and 47% earned a merit.

The Western District saw 760 images, with 39% earning merits, and the Southeast District rounds things out with 986 entries and 48% earning merits. That's a grand total of 4,426 entries with about 46% earning merits (all counting towards earning various photographic degrees!). 

These stats show how many understand what a big accomplishment earning a merit at the District Photographic Competitions is! So go ahead, brag about it! 

Don't forget that the judging for IPC will be held July 30-August 2, 2017 and will be streamed live! Registration to enter your images opens May 22, 2017 - June 21, 2017 by 5pm ET. Entries received June 21 after 5 pm ET will still be accepted with a late fee through July 6, 2017 by 5pm ET. Please note that no entries will be accepted after that point. Get your images ready and we'll see you at the IPC!


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

201705-1_ndr-2__large_800_568_75_428e07214a8a3e9a.jpg
Approach a stranger and create an alluring portrait in just 30 seconds? No way, you say. But Nicola Davison Reed is doing just that.

Nicola's street photography method is tried-and-true process she's developed over the course of her "30 Seconds of Street Portrait" project. And she's got some tips for other photographers who may feel a bit shy about talking to strangers.






may17botmblogfooter.JPG
by James Yates

Beginning next week, May 22, photographers can enter their work in PPA's International Photographic Competition (IPC). We hear from past entrants that entering images in the IPC is one of the best ways to improve as a photographer. During the IPC, jurors give competitors the opportunity to receive advice that will improve their future output and could land their work in PPA's Loan Collection, and be honored at Imaging USA 2018 in Nashville! 

If you choose to have your images critiqued, you'll get a recording of a judge going through each image you've entered in the photo competition, explaining how it stacks up against the 12 elements of a winning image, and what you could have done to take your image to the next level if you fell a little short! So, don't be shy! Enter your images to be critiqued by official jurors at this year's competition. Recorded critiques are a fantastic way to learn, specifically, how you can take your images to the next level.

To give you an idea of the types of things you can learn from a critique at IPC, check out this one from last year's competition. This is "Technique, Composition, Interest" by Jerome Ranch, critiqued by Adrian Henson, M. Photog.MEI.Cr., CPP. 


Thinking about entering your images and ordering a critique? Take the plunge! You'll get the opportunity to:

  • Understand what the judges expect from competitors 
  • Get an idea about the current state of your photography 
  • Improve your work with advice straight from jurors to help you score in next year's competition
Having a judge take time to give personal advice on how to improve a specific image is just what you need to grow as an artist!

The judging for IPC will be held July 30-August 2, 2017. Registration to enter your images opens May 22, 2017 - June 21, 2017 by 5pm ET. Entries received after 6/21 will still be accepted with a late fee through July 6, 2017 by 5pm ET. Please note that no entries will be accepted after that point. 

This year's IPC has some new rules, so be sure to check them at PPA.com/IPC. And don't forget to enter your images early to beat the crowds and save some money. Good luck!


Thumbnail image for James.JPG
James Yates is an Atlanta-based writer/actor and the Communications Specialist at Professional Photographers of America (PPA). A graduate of Georgia State University, James has worked in the non-profit sector his whole life and is proud to be able to help artists achieve their goals. In his spare time he can be found walking his dogs on the Beltline or partaking in the nightly theater and comedy scene in the ATL.


may17botmblogfooter.JPG
by Chris Homer
Weekly_Top_Ten.jpg

The end of the week is here! As you wind down and head into the weekend, take some time to enjoy our favorite photography blog posts from around the web. 

SEO 101: You've probably heard that you need to do some type of Search Engine Optimization (SEO) on your site in order for clients to find your business in web searches. If you're not sure where to start, read this post from PPA! It covers the basics of SEO so you can get started in the right direction. 

COPYRIGHT: News flash: Taking watermarked photos and putting them on Facebook, scanning a print and making it digital, or just yanking an image from a Google search and sharing it...these are all instances of copyright infringement and are against the law! Improve Photography has a nice article summarizing the fight for copyright protection (with a nice shout out to the work PPA has been doing!). 

TUTORIAL: When photographing on location, stabilizing your camera can be an issue! Check out this post from PetaPixel for some quick hacks you can use for better camera stabilization. 

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING: Do you use Instagram to help market your photography? It's become a powerful tool for photographers, so if you're looking to have a presence on Instagram (or already do) check out these tips from PhotoFocus to learn how you can better connect with potential clients. 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Here's a great post for the commercial photographers out there. Read how photographer Dustin Dolby creates great photos of wine bottles using only one speedlight on DIY Photography. 

PORTRAITS: Whether you've been taking portraits for a long time, or are new to the game, this post from Light Stalking is good to review! It covers 3 fundamental elements of a portrait that lead to great results when done right. 

CAPITOL HILL ADVOCACY:  Last week was a pretty crazy one on Capitol Hill (as they mostly are lately) and, lost in the shuffle, was the fact that the companion bill to H.R. 1695, the bill PPA's Grassroots Team lobbied to get through the House, has now been introduced in the Senate! Read up on the next step in our fight here. 

BUSINESS...ETIQUETTE: Have you ever engaged in a flame war (posting negative comments) on a Facebook discussion with another photographer? Stop doing that! This post from Fstoppers talks about how potential clients can see these comments, and how it may make them choose to not do business with you.

TUTORIAL: Low-key photography is a style where the main elements are darkness and negative space. You can create some very unique portraits using this style. If you're intrigued by it, Digital Photography School provides a tutorial on the basics of creating a low-key image. 

WALL ART: Suzanne Deaton joined PPA, took advantage of educational opportunities, and decided to pride her business on producing tangible products that clients can appreciate as art. Today, she operates a successful studio focused on wall print and in-person selling. Read all about it on Professional Photographer magazine. 

There you have 'em, our weekly blog post roundup! What photography blogs or podcasts do YOU follow? Post your favorites on theLoop or email them to us at OnlineContentCommittee@PPA.com.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG
By Sidra Safri
iStock-607606926.jpg

It's been a year since the introduction of the Section 107 drone regulations and many photographers are still extremely excited! As more and more photographers look to incorporate drones into their businesses, the FAA is attempting to stay on top of the influx of waivers that are coming in. 

At first introduction, the FAA was able to process waivers within 90 days. Now, that waiting period has gone up to 120 days!  To ensure you waiver is approved in a timely manner, be careful to apply for the correct waiver and be as detailed as possible. Over the next eight-to-nine weeks, PPA will break down these waivers, providing you with examples as to when you can apply for them and what sort of information to provide to ensure your wavier is processed as quickly and smoothly as possible.
 
The first waiver we will address is Section 107.25- Operation from a moving vehicle, boat, or aircraft.  In accordance with the Section 107 regulations, a drone operator may not operate a drone while being transported via any method. However, there is waiver for this! One may apply for this waiver when wanting to get a shot of an aerial view for commercial or real estate purposes, inspecting power lines or pipelines, even simply shooting a video for a client.  Since there is a lot going on logistically, it is understandable that the FAA wants to approve these sorts of uses. 

When applying for a waiver to operate a drone via a moving method of transportation, include as much information as possible. Include why you are requesting this waver, the time of day, a backup plan (just in case something goes wrong). Also, it helps to have another set of eyes on the drone. Include a plan to have someone watching the drone in action to add another layer of safety. The more detail you have, the more likely the FAA will approve your request, and the less back-and-forth there is trying to get additional information. At the same time, the FAA has also requested you be as detailed as possible, but to not ask for more then you need. This will cause delays in your request, and possibly even lead to a denial. To request a drone waiver or see additional waiver options visit the FAA website.

Stay tuned for the next part in our series on drone waivers, or read them below! 


For more info on all things drones, of course, head to
PPA.com/Drones.

may17botmblogfooter.JPG

by Sidra Safri
IMG_2964.JPG

As photographers we all understand the importance of the Copyright Office and everything it is meant to do for the world of copyright. However, besides being the protector of copyrights, the Office's other main purpose is to continuously provide Congress with the proper knowledge necessary to make decisions in the area of Intellectual Property. 

However, to fully understand the Copyright Office and how copyright law has evolved, it is necessary to go back to the early years of America. In 1787, during discussions for the Constitutional Convention, Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 was added. It stated "the Congress shall have power...to promote the process of science and useful arts, by securing for limited time to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." This law would go on to shape Copyright Law for many years to come.

Below is a short timeline of how both the Copyright Office and Copyright Law evolved. 

  • 1790: The first Copyright Act is passed and provides American creators with the ability to control when to print, reprint, or publish their work for up to 14 years, with the ability to renew for another 14 years. This was done to encourage creators to continue to add to society while giving them an incentive to do so. 
  • 1831: This was the first review of the Copyright Act. This revision allowed the protection of copyright to be extended to 28 years with the possibility to renew for another 14 years. This change was made to ensure American creators had the same, if not similar, protections as their European counterparts. 
  • 1870: This was the first revision of the Copyright Act. When the Copyright Office was first created it was up to each individual District Court to file copyright claims. However, with this revision, the office was moved from the District Courts into the Copyright Office, where it would remain. 
  • 1909: After another major review of the Copyright Act, the items that could be protected by copyright were increased to include more categories. This review also extended the renewal from 14 years to 28 years. During this time, many congressional members were trying to find a balance between allowing the creator to enjoy the benefits of their creation and also allowing the public to enjoy these creations. 
  • 1976:  After 67 years of no revisions to the Copyright Act, it was necessary to incorporate technological advancements, as well as to prepare to join the Berne Convention which was joined by our European counterparts in 1886. Also during this revision, copyright protection was extended to the life of the author plus 50 or 75 years if the work was done for hire and/or for unpublished works. 
  • 1992: An amendment was made to make copyright renewal automatic, and therefore really limited what items were joining the public domain. 
  • 1998: Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act extended protection from 50 years after the life of the creator to 70 years after the life of the creator. 
  • 1998: Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) brought some aspects of copyright law to the 90s that would address challenges many creators were facing, while attempting to regulate digital items. 
  • 1999: Digital Theft Deterrence and Copyright Damages Improvement: With infringement becoming so easy, it was necessary to find some way to deter this from happening. Congress approved a large increase in the minimum statutory damages. The minimums went from $500 to $700 and the maximums went from $20,000 to between $30,000 and $150,000 depending on intent. 
  • 2016: Small Claims bill is introduced by Representative Judy of Chu of California. Proposing an alternative method to pursuing infringement claims valued at less than $30,000. During this same year, Chairman Goodlatte circulated a white paper highlighting the importance of Small Clams and making it a priority for the upcoming year. 
  • 2017: Representative Goodlatte introduced H.R 1695 to turn the Register of Copyright into a Senate-confirmed, Presidential Appointee, therefore ensuring a person with ample copyright knowledge is able to run the copyright office, and have a certain degree of autonomy from the Library of Congress. This bill currently has been introduced in the Senate at S. 1010 and will be heading to committee shortly. 

As you can see, the history of copyright in the U.S. is a long and winding road. PPA is making sure YOUR rights are protected by being a constant presence on Capitol Hill during these exciting months. Be sure to sign up and show your support (and share with all your friends!) at PPA.com/Grassroots. 

may17botmblogfooter.JPG



Tags

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Categories