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Results tagged “Drone Photography” from PPA Today

By Sidra Safri

Congratulations on the purchase of your drone! This is an exciting development in the world
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 of photography and one we know you will thoroughly enjoy. However, before you can begin taking aerial photos and charging your clients, there are a few things you MUST do! 

1. Register your drone at the FAA's website
If you are only going to use your drone as a hobby and not for commercial purposes, then you do not have to register. However, the moment you decide to charge for your drone photography, you must register with the FAA.

2. Study/ Get Licensed
In order to fly your drone for commercial purposes, you must have a section 107 drone license. This shows the FAA that you know enough about aerial flight patterns, and other facts, to man a drone, and are well prepared in all situations. You can find plenty of study materials at PPA.com/drones or the FAA website. In order to get your certificate, you must score a 70 or higher on the exam. The exam will cost you $150 dollars to take and it must be taken at one of the FAA testing centers which can be found here. Also make sure you are aware of what waivers you can apply for. For more details or to go ahead and apply for a waiver, visit the FAA's website

3. Review your insurance.
With your PPA membership, you are already insured with PhotoCare. However, this does not include drone coverage. You will need to increase your liability insurance. This can be done by contacting Lockton Affinity and they will walk you through the entire process. You can find more information here.

4. Download the B4U fly App
This app is created by the FAA. You want to make sure you use this app before you fly. This will let you know if there are any flight restrictions, as well as if you are too close to an airport or possibly flying in airspace you are not allowed to fly in.

5. Get PPA Drone Certified
This allows you to stand out and show your clients that not only did you put in the time and effort to legally be able to fly, but also you were willing to put in the time to take fantastic drone photos. There is a learning curve to drone photography, and being a PPA Certified Drone Photographer will help you get past that learning curve in no time! For more information, visit PPA's Certified Drone Photographer page.

6. Stay up to date on all things drones.
With drone rules changing every day, it is necessary to stay current on any new developments. Visit http://www.ppa.com/drones/ to be in-the-know on all things drones!


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By Sidra Safri

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As a part of our drone waiver series, we will continue to talk about the 9 waivers drone photographers can apply for under the section 107 regulations. 

Today our focus will be Section 107.29 and being unable to fly at night. The FAA drone regulations state: "No person may operate a small unmanned aircraft system during the night." This means that, without a waiver, a drone operator can only fly during civil twilight (30 min before sunrise), during the day, and evening twilight (30 min after sunset).*+

Luckily, for many drone-photographers, the most commonly-requested and approved waiver is Night Operation. When applying for this waiver, be specific, but not too specific. You do not want to limit yourself too much. Do your research on the area and show the FAA that you are prepared to handle any possible situation. This includes, explaining how the operator will maintain a visual line of sight with the drone during the darkness, how you plan to avoid people, structures, and other aircraft, and how you will know - in darkness - the location, altitude, and movement of the drone. 

To submit your waivers, visit the FAA's website. After submitting your waiver to the FAA, make sure you pay attention to any correspondence from the FAA to avoid delays. See you next week for part 3! And if you missed part 1, go back and read about Section 107.25 - operation from a moving vehicle, boat, or aircraft.

*Must use anti-collision lights that are visible for 3 statutory miles when flying during either twilights. 
+Alaska: Twilight is determined by the Almanac. 

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By Chris Homer

Are you interested in drone photography, but aren't sure where to start? During this spring's Super 1 Day Photography Workshops (May 8 - 22, 2017) there's a number of classes that will help you learn how to become a drone photographer. Check them out below!

Springfield, MA
May 8, 2017
With John McCarthy, M.Photog.Cr., CPP, ABI,API

Interested in turning your love of drones into a profitable expenditure? Join FAA certified instructor, John McCarthy and learn what it takes to get your FAA Remote Pilot Certificate to fly small unmanned aircraft systems. This course will help you prepare for the test as John introduces you to numerous tips and study aids in addition to online materials and practice tests from the FAA.

Drones-FAA Part 107 Prep Course
College Station, TX
May 11, 2017 & May 12, 2017 (same class, two date options!)
With Robert Norwood, Kathy Norwood, Cr.Photog., CPP

Drones are a hot item with photographers today! But unlike most aspects of photography, drone photography requires a government license. This course will teach photographers the rules and regulations required by the FAA to successfully pass the Part 107 FAA exam.

This course will cover the 5 main subject areas of the test including regulations, airspace classifications and operating requirements, weather, loading and performance, and drone operations. A sample test will be administered to prepare the participants to take the Part 107 exam upon completion of this course. Walk out ready to ace your exam!

Wayne, OK
May 18, 2017
With Larry J. Foster, M.Photog., CPP

Drones are the hot topic right now. But what is legal and what is not? What can I do with a drone and do I need a license? What is controlled airspace and how do I read a NOTAM? Confused? This class will help clear the air and help you learn the proper way to use your drone and get prepared for the FAA UAG test.

If you're looking to get started in drone photography, register for one of these classes today! Don't forget to visit PPA.com/Drones for more resources on passing the FAA test, educational videos and more. 


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.

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By Sidra Safri

Section 107 Drones regulations have been out less than a year, and drone usage has skyrocketed. Currently, according to the FAA, there are approximately 7,200 registered drones. With such a large increase in drone usage, the number of close calls between drones and airplanes has also dramatically increased. The FAA reported over 1,700 close calls in 2016. A close call incident is when a drone is within 100 feet of an airplane. Being this close to an airplane can cause more damage than a bird, especially if it hits one of the engines. These close calls put not only the pilot's life in danger but also the lives of the passengers on board. 

Currently, Section 107 regulations state that if you are flying in B, C, D, or E airspace you need a waiver. The larger concern is when drones fly in class G airspace. To fly in class G airspace you do not need to a get a waiver, but you need permission from the air traffic control tower. Granted, other than the "Right to Yield" requirement there is nothing that states how far a drone must stay from other aircraft, but just that it is illegal. However, for the safety of the passengers, and pilots it's necessary for drone pilots to be hyper aware of their aerial surroundings. 

It is of the utmost importance for all drone operators, whether they are certified or uncertified to gain proper experience in operating, handling, and flying a drone. This practice ensures that everyone is safe, and everyone can enjoy the airspace. For more education and information about the Section 107 regulations, please visit the FAA Website. Also, do not forget to report any accidents here, and always check the B4U fly app before liftoff! 


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By Chris Homer

So you've gotten your license from the FAA to be a drone pilot, and you're ready to start offering drone photography to your clients. What should you do next?

"10 Best Drone Practices" on PPMag.com shares some steps all drone photographers should take when starting out. If you're considering offering drone photography, read this article first. You'll pick up advice that can save you some major headaches later!

And don't forget to visit PPA.com/Drones for even more advice on passing the FAA test, drone insurance, news and more!


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.


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By Chris Homer

Have you been considering drone photography as an addition to your business? Imaging USA is tackling this hot topic with a host of brand new classes. For the first time ever, Imaging USA will have a "Drone Zone"! This is where you can learn anything and everything drone related. There will be speakers who are pioneers in the area, a representative from the FAA to answer all your questions, and rumor has it that you might even get to FLY A DRONE! 

Even better, you can have access to the entire Drone track (classes, presentations, and demos) through an Expo-Only pass for only $35! Take a look at everything being offered in the Drone Zone below and register here for Imaging USA 2017 today! 

Drones and Aerial Photography 101
Randy Braun and Stacy Garlington will start from scratch speaking plain English to explain where, when, how and why. This class is for complete beginners who are a little bit nervous and confused about aerial drone photography. Randy and Stacy will encourage participants to relax and ask questions throughout the class.

Flights - Camera - Action
Designing your commercial imaging flight today requires planning, visualization and safety considerations. Eddie Tapp, M.Photog., MEI,Cr.,API,CPP, will discuss tips, techniques and information that will help your flight strategies from composition flights, camera settings, safety practices and more. Even if your considering drone aerials in your business, come and prepare to take flight for your creative imaging experience.

Elevate Yourself and Your Business Using Small Drones
Camera-drones are the hottest thing in photography industry. Randy Bruan & Stacy Garlington from the DJI Photography Development Team will discuss drone hardware, flying basics, image capture, simple processing, do's and don'ts, and how to earn additional income with your drone.

Getting Started in Aerial Drone Imaging
The composition rules have changed, you can now move your camera in 3D space. Learn how to cast of traditional photography constraints and elevate your photography. In this session Colin Smith will provide tips on the best way to fly to capture the best photographs and video. We will also explore some basic image editing of aerial images in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

By Chris Homer

The FAA's recent updates to the regulations for flying a drone have paved the way for photographers to begin using them in their business (read the new regulations here), however, aerial drone photography has a whole host of unique issues you need to be aware of before you begin offering this type of service! 

If you want to become an aerial drone photographer, join PPA on August 19 at 2pm ET for the "Aerial Drone Photography: Where Do I Begin?" webinar! During the webinar, drone photography industry insiders Randy Braun and Stacy Garlington will respond to some of the most frequently asked questions about drone photography, like 'What equipment do I need?', 'How do I learn?', 'What are the rules?' and more! Join them live on August 19 and get the answers you need to start off in drone photography! 

Don't forget to visit PPA.com/Drones for all the latest information on regulations, registering your drone, becoming a drone pilot and more. You can also access past webinars on drone photography to continue your education on this exciting new field of photography!


ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.



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By Chris Homer

Last week, we broke the news that the long-awaited FAA regulations relating to Unmanned
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 Aircraft Systems (UAS) weighing less than 55 pounds were announced! With the new regulations, if you want to use a small drone in your photography business you must be certified by the FAA. Here are some more details on becoming certified!

According to the new FAA rules, the estimated out-of-pocket cost for an individual to become certified as a remote pilot with a small UAS rating is $150. This will cover the testing fee.

The required aeronautical knowledge test will cover the following subject areas:

- Regulations applicable to small UAS operations

- Airspace classification and operating requirements, maintenance and inspection procedures, and flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation

- Official sources of weather and effects of weather on small unmanned aircraft performance

- Small UAS loading and performance

- Emergency procedures

- Crew resource management

- Radio communication procedures

- Determining the performance of small unmanned aircraft

- Physiological effects of drugs and alcohol

- Aeronautical decision-making and judgment

- Airport operations.

You'll be able to take the test at more than 700 FAA-approved testing centers. Get more information from the FAA on certification here

And don't forget you can learn even more about the new FAA regulations for drones during PPA's "It's Legal To Use Drones in My Business, Now What?" webinar on July 12 at 2pm ET.

ch_headshot_100x100.jpgAbout the author:
Chris Homer is PPA's SEO & Web Specialist, which basically makes Google Analytics his best friend. A graduate of the University of Georgia, Chris cheers passionately (and obnoxiously) for the Bulldogs in all things from football to checkers. When he's not hard at work on PPA's websites, you'll find Chris at auto racing events around the southeast, where he's known as a master architect of tent villages.


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